Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Human Wellbeing Related to the Salish Sea

Description

Monitoring how ecosystems, cultural amenities, and governance are contributing to human wellbeing is a critical part of managing social ecological systems in the Salish Sea Region. We demonstrate the potential to use Google Consumer Insights (GSI) as a method of monitoring ecosystem related wellbeing. Using results from 4,418 respondents to an online survey conducted in Washington’s Puget Sound, we describe the relationship between overall life satisfaction (a standard global measure for subjective wellbeing) and diverse metrics of engaging cultural ecosystem services. We apply multiple correspondence analysis to generate factors underlying key areas of ecosystem services including sense of place, outdoor activities, cultural activities, and psychological wellbeing in addition to a measure of good governance. While we use ordered logistic regression to demonstrate that cultural activities, sense of place, and outdoor activities are associated with life satisfaction, we also provide estimates of how these key factors vary across demographic groups and spatial characteristics of Puget Sound through use of subgroup and small area estimation (SAE). This allows us to compare the results of our survey’s subjective measures to readily available objective indicators such as access to shellfish beds, availability of local green space, and proximity to local farmers markets. We find that GSI type surveys enable low cost monitoring that matches many objective indicators for the given time period. This may allow the systematic use of GSI surveys as a low cost continual monitoring method to generate evidence of changes at sub-regional scales across time periods. In our conclusion, we provide recommendations regarding how subjective measures can be gathered through services such as GSI. The results of this analysis are useful for policy practitioners working on monitoring of social systems in the Salish Sea region, as well as for academic researchers investigating the relationship between human wellbeing and ecosystem services.

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Measuring Local Subjective Wellbeing in the Puget Sound Region

2016SSEC

Monitoring how ecosystems, cultural amenities, and governance are contributing to human wellbeing is a critical part of managing social ecological systems in the Salish Sea Region. We demonstrate the potential to use Google Consumer Insights (GSI) as a method of monitoring ecosystem related wellbeing. Using results from 4,418 respondents to an online survey conducted in Washington’s Puget Sound, we describe the relationship between overall life satisfaction (a standard global measure for subjective wellbeing) and diverse metrics of engaging cultural ecosystem services. We apply multiple correspondence analysis to generate factors underlying key areas of ecosystem services including sense of place, outdoor activities, cultural activities, and psychological wellbeing in addition to a measure of good governance. While we use ordered logistic regression to demonstrate that cultural activities, sense of place, and outdoor activities are associated with life satisfaction, we also provide estimates of how these key factors vary across demographic groups and spatial characteristics of Puget Sound through use of subgroup and small area estimation (SAE). This allows us to compare the results of our survey’s subjective measures to readily available objective indicators such as access to shellfish beds, availability of local green space, and proximity to local farmers markets. We find that GSI type surveys enable low cost monitoring that matches many objective indicators for the given time period. This may allow the systematic use of GSI surveys as a low cost continual monitoring method to generate evidence of changes at sub-regional scales across time periods. In our conclusion, we provide recommendations regarding how subjective measures can be gathered through services such as GSI. The results of this analysis are useful for policy practitioners working on monitoring of social systems in the Salish Sea region, as well as for academic researchers investigating the relationship between human wellbeing and ecosystem services.