Presenter/Author Information

Terrie Klinger, tklinger@uw.eduFollow

Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Building coastal ocean social-ecological resilience in the Salish Sea: what does it mean and how can it be done?

Description

The impending effects of ocean acidification on coastal ecosystems remain poorly resolved. Under such conditions, resilience approaches offer a framework for shaping practical responses to the likely biological and ecological effects of OA. Such approaches can be implemented under several existing management authorities, thereby avoiding lengthy delays associated with the establishment of new regulations. For example, existing provisions for ecosystem-based fisheries management, spatial protections (e.g., MPAs), and coastal ecosystem management all can be used to support ecological resilience. Promoting resilience to OA in the social system presents a greater challenge, primarily due to information deficiencies and substantial uncertainties. Understanding vulnerabilities of human communities with respect to OA is a first critical step in building social-ecological resilience in the Salish Sea.

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Building Resilience to Ocean Acidification in the Salish Sea

2016SSEC

The impending effects of ocean acidification on coastal ecosystems remain poorly resolved. Under such conditions, resilience approaches offer a framework for shaping practical responses to the likely biological and ecological effects of OA. Such approaches can be implemented under several existing management authorities, thereby avoiding lengthy delays associated with the establishment of new regulations. For example, existing provisions for ecosystem-based fisheries management, spatial protections (e.g., MPAs), and coastal ecosystem management all can be used to support ecological resilience. Promoting resilience to OA in the social system presents a greater challenge, primarily due to information deficiencies and substantial uncertainties. Understanding vulnerabilities of human communities with respect to OA is a first critical step in building social-ecological resilience in the Salish Sea.