Proposed Abstract Title

From sense of place to visualization of the coast: Examining people’s relationships with coastal places to better understand how to develop geovisualizations for collaborative management and planning

Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Integrating Social Science into Ecosystem-Based Management

Location

2016SSEC

Description

Effective coastal management and governance is integrative and incorporates the wide variety of user needs, values and interests associated with the coast. This requires inclusive approaches to management that are cognizant of how different people understand coastal environments and relate to them as ‘places’, imbued with values and meanings, rather than simply just ‘spaces’. Advancements in GIS and media technologies have created opportunities for developing tools that allow for place-based approaches to coastal management. In particular, ‘geovisualizations’ now can be constructed with degrees of realism and accuracy that allow people to recognize and relate to them as ‘real places’, thus allowing them to act as ‘place-based’ tools. However, despite the connection between geovisualization and sense of place, research in these two areas is very rarely explicitly linked and explored the same studies, leading to lost opportunities in the advancement of knowledge and practices around collaborative management. This presentation addresses this disconnect and illustrates the benefits of integrating the two areas of research by sharing early findings on study that examines how understanding local sense of place can inform the build of a coastal geovisualization for collaborative management. Conducted in the Capital Regional District (CRD) of BC, the study draws from the disciplines of environmental psychology and human geography to examine linkages between how people relate to coastal places and how they conceptualize/perceive said places. Methods involve administering a survey to a random sample of CRD residents (n=277) to obtain psychometric data on how people relate to place and text-based data on how people conceptualize/perceive place. Psychometric data was dimenionalized through factor analysis and text-based data was coded; then, correlations between place relationships and place conceptualizations were elucidated. Findings from the study provide insight on important elements and features for developing a CRD-based coastal geovisualization for collaborative management and planning.

Comments

Robert Newell will be presenting this work.

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From sense of place to visualization of the coast: Examining people’s relationships with coastal places to better understand how to develop geovisualizations for collaborative management and planning

2016SSEC

Effective coastal management and governance is integrative and incorporates the wide variety of user needs, values and interests associated with the coast. This requires inclusive approaches to management that are cognizant of how different people understand coastal environments and relate to them as ‘places’, imbued with values and meanings, rather than simply just ‘spaces’. Advancements in GIS and media technologies have created opportunities for developing tools that allow for place-based approaches to coastal management. In particular, ‘geovisualizations’ now can be constructed with degrees of realism and accuracy that allow people to recognize and relate to them as ‘real places’, thus allowing them to act as ‘place-based’ tools. However, despite the connection between geovisualization and sense of place, research in these two areas is very rarely explicitly linked and explored the same studies, leading to lost opportunities in the advancement of knowledge and practices around collaborative management. This presentation addresses this disconnect and illustrates the benefits of integrating the two areas of research by sharing early findings on study that examines how understanding local sense of place can inform the build of a coastal geovisualization for collaborative management. Conducted in the Capital Regional District (CRD) of BC, the study draws from the disciplines of environmental psychology and human geography to examine linkages between how people relate to coastal places and how they conceptualize/perceive said places. Methods involve administering a survey to a random sample of CRD residents (n=277) to obtain psychometric data on how people relate to place and text-based data on how people conceptualize/perceive place. Psychometric data was dimenionalized through factor analysis and text-based data was coded; then, correlations between place relationships and place conceptualizations were elucidated. Findings from the study provide insight on important elements and features for developing a CRD-based coastal geovisualization for collaborative management and planning.