Proposed Abstract Title

Prioritizing Management Actions and Building Resilience Using Network Theory and Risk Analysis

Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Building coastal ocean social-ecological resilience in the Salish Sea: what does it mean and how can it be done?

Location

2016SSEC

Description

Coastal areas are some of the most populated on the planet, and are host to diverse human uses. These human uses, operating alongside global stressors such as climate change, have associated environmental (considered broadly including social) impacts that can threaten ecosystem services that foster resilience in coastal ecosystems. Management and mitigation strategies are often needed to reduce these impacts and maintain social-ecological resilience. Sustaining both human uses as well as the environment is a daunting challenge due to the multitude of potential management strategies that can be applied. Understanding the risks posed to the environment from human activities as a network of impact pathways can help management organizations understand prominent drivers of impact on key environmental components. Using network theory, we show how management organizations often implicitly assume linear pathways as dominant drivers of impact, which, when wrong, lead to ineffectual management strategies. There are often prominent indirect pathways of impact requiring management as well. Using a risk assessment with network theory can reveal important leverage points for management interventions and/or mitigation actions to effectively reduce impacts on important environmental components. Reviewing a case study on the coast of British Columbia, we show how these leverage points can be revealed and lead to strategic, prioritized management actions. Such an approach, which requires only literature review and expert judgement elicitation, can be utilized to realize management goals in the Salish Sea to help promote a resilient coast.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Prioritizing Management Actions and Building Resilience Using Network Theory and Risk Analysis

2016SSEC

Coastal areas are some of the most populated on the planet, and are host to diverse human uses. These human uses, operating alongside global stressors such as climate change, have associated environmental (considered broadly including social) impacts that can threaten ecosystem services that foster resilience in coastal ecosystems. Management and mitigation strategies are often needed to reduce these impacts and maintain social-ecological resilience. Sustaining both human uses as well as the environment is a daunting challenge due to the multitude of potential management strategies that can be applied. Understanding the risks posed to the environment from human activities as a network of impact pathways can help management organizations understand prominent drivers of impact on key environmental components. Using network theory, we show how management organizations often implicitly assume linear pathways as dominant drivers of impact, which, when wrong, lead to ineffectual management strategies. There are often prominent indirect pathways of impact requiring management as well. Using a risk assessment with network theory can reveal important leverage points for management interventions and/or mitigation actions to effectively reduce impacts on important environmental components. Reviewing a case study on the coast of British Columbia, we show how these leverage points can be revealed and lead to strategic, prioritized management actions. Such an approach, which requires only literature review and expert judgement elicitation, can be utilized to realize management goals in the Salish Sea to help promote a resilient coast.