Proposed Abstract Title

Impacts to Job-Quality through “Absentee” Catch-Share Ownership in West Coast Groundfish Fisheries.

Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Integrating Social Science into Ecosystem-Based Management

Location

2016SSEC

Description

Application of ecosystem-based fisheries management principles requires understanding of how policy tools, like ITQ or catch-share systems, affect human components of social ecological systems (SES). Human well-being is a domain of particular interest related to U.S and Canadian Pacific Coast commercial groundfish fisheries where in recent years ITQ systems have seen notable increase in implementation. Job-satisfaction is identified as a pivotal factor affecting well-being, relating to individual attributes of mental health and longevity,and social problems. Changes in fishery policy, like catch-share systems, can alter season length, technological capacity, employment period, which in turn may impact job-satisfaction of those employed within the fishery. One area of interest for evaluating job-quality relates to the pattern of “absentee ownership” wherein the owner catch-share quota, does not actively participate in the fishery beyond leasing of quota to vessels. To address this topic, we offer preliminary findings from semi-structured interviews and social surveys conducted with participating fishers in the federally managed U.S. West Coast Groundfish fishery. Through collaboration with the NWFSC Human Dimensions Pacific Coast Groundfish Social Survey, Washington and Oregon fishing communities were sampled and asked to provide feedback on how effects of “absentee ownership” were perceived to impact job-quality. Perceived benefits and costs of the practice to participating fishers are investigated. Additionally, underlying social factors contributing to the cause of “absentee” ownership are also explored, i.e. patterns of decisions that lead to situations where vessels operate with quota owner not on-board. The goal of this work is to provide insight into factors impacting human well-being in Pacific Coast, and Salish Sea fisheries and the future development of appropriate indicators useful to evaluate social impacts of catch-share based management strategies.

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Impacts to Job-Quality through “Absentee” Catch-Share Ownership in West Coast Groundfish Fisheries.

2016SSEC

Application of ecosystem-based fisheries management principles requires understanding of how policy tools, like ITQ or catch-share systems, affect human components of social ecological systems (SES). Human well-being is a domain of particular interest related to U.S and Canadian Pacific Coast commercial groundfish fisheries where in recent years ITQ systems have seen notable increase in implementation. Job-satisfaction is identified as a pivotal factor affecting well-being, relating to individual attributes of mental health and longevity,and social problems. Changes in fishery policy, like catch-share systems, can alter season length, technological capacity, employment period, which in turn may impact job-satisfaction of those employed within the fishery. One area of interest for evaluating job-quality relates to the pattern of “absentee ownership” wherein the owner catch-share quota, does not actively participate in the fishery beyond leasing of quota to vessels. To address this topic, we offer preliminary findings from semi-structured interviews and social surveys conducted with participating fishers in the federally managed U.S. West Coast Groundfish fishery. Through collaboration with the NWFSC Human Dimensions Pacific Coast Groundfish Social Survey, Washington and Oregon fishing communities were sampled and asked to provide feedback on how effects of “absentee ownership” were perceived to impact job-quality. Perceived benefits and costs of the practice to participating fishers are investigated. Additionally, underlying social factors contributing to the cause of “absentee” ownership are also explored, i.e. patterns of decisions that lead to situations where vessels operate with quota owner not on-board. The goal of this work is to provide insight into factors impacting human well-being in Pacific Coast, and Salish Sea fisheries and the future development of appropriate indicators useful to evaluate social impacts of catch-share based management strategies.