Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Integrating Social Science into Ecosystem-Based Management

Description

Many citizens and decision-makers of the Salish Sea region are global citizens—attentive to issues of environmental justice and women’s rights at an international scale. However, an ability to analyze local environmental issues through a gender lens in order to create equitable environmental management plans is sorely lacking. In 2015, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature in collaboration with U.N. Women released five datasets measuring women’s participation in global environmental decision-making.[1] These datasets illustrate how women are sorely underrepresented in important decision-making roles—raising concern for whether the outcomes of climate financing, mitigation, and adaptation are equitable across society. With a goal of translating these “lessons learned” to the Salish Sea, a gender analysis of existing documents relevant to a local context is performed. Documents include State of Knowledge: Climate Change in Puget Sound by University of Washington’s Climate Impacts Group, the Seattle Climate Action Plan, and Washington State’s Integrated Climate Response Strategy.[2][3][4] Gender analysis includes keyword counts and thematic qualitative analysis to identify gaps in existing data, areas of concern, and potential opportunities to help decision-makers create gender-equitable climate adaptation programs in the Salish Sea region.

[1] IUCN Global Gender Office. 2015. Environment and Gender Index. Washington, D.C. Http://genderandenvironment.org/egi/.

[2] Mauger, G.S., et al. 2015. State of Knowledge: Climate Change in Puget Sound. Climate Impacts Group, University of Washington, Seattle.

[3] Foster, J., et al. 2015. Seattle Climate Action Plan. Seattle, WA.

[4] Washington State Department of Ecology. 2012. Preparing for a Changing Climate: Washington State’s Integrated Climate Response Strategy. Publication No. 12-01-004.

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Gaps and Opportunities for Gender Equitable Climate Adaptation in the Salish Sea

2016SSEC

Many citizens and decision-makers of the Salish Sea region are global citizens—attentive to issues of environmental justice and women’s rights at an international scale. However, an ability to analyze local environmental issues through a gender lens in order to create equitable environmental management plans is sorely lacking. In 2015, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature in collaboration with U.N. Women released five datasets measuring women’s participation in global environmental decision-making.[1] These datasets illustrate how women are sorely underrepresented in important decision-making roles—raising concern for whether the outcomes of climate financing, mitigation, and adaptation are equitable across society. With a goal of translating these “lessons learned” to the Salish Sea, a gender analysis of existing documents relevant to a local context is performed. Documents include State of Knowledge: Climate Change in Puget Sound by University of Washington’s Climate Impacts Group, the Seattle Climate Action Plan, and Washington State’s Integrated Climate Response Strategy.[2][3][4] Gender analysis includes keyword counts and thematic qualitative analysis to identify gaps in existing data, areas of concern, and potential opportunities to help decision-makers create gender-equitable climate adaptation programs in the Salish Sea region.

[1] IUCN Global Gender Office. 2015. Environment and Gender Index. Washington, D.C. Http://genderandenvironment.org/egi/.

[2] Mauger, G.S., et al. 2015. State of Knowledge: Climate Change in Puget Sound. Climate Impacts Group, University of Washington, Seattle.

[3] Foster, J., et al. 2015. Seattle Climate Action Plan. Seattle, WA.

[4] Washington State Department of Ecology. 2012. Preparing for a Changing Climate: Washington State’s Integrated Climate Response Strategy. Publication No. 12-01-004.