Proposed Abstract Title

Cross-boundary Collaboration on the Implementation of a Unique Manure Application Risk Management Tool for Water Quality Improvement

Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Cross-Border Local Leadership Exchange I: Water Quality in Border Areas'

Location

2016SSEC

Description

Throughout the Puget Sound and Strait of Georgia regions (combined Salish Sea), impacted and poorly managed agriculture has repeatedly been advanced as a leading contributor to surface and ground water pollution. Both U.S. and Canadian producers and technical staff have recognized the need for a collaborative approach to addressing the problem. In particular, improvements in nutrient application methods and use of decision support tools are necessary to protect resources from further negative impacts. Studies conducted by the Whatcom Conservation District (WCD) in Washington have shown that strategic manure application practices and timing can significantly reduce the potential of nutrient runoff and leaching events. By utilizing a unique manure Application Risk Management (ARM) strategy that encourages applications be tailored to soil type and account for current field and weather conditions, a significant reduction in pollution potential can be realized as compared to “conventional” application practices. The ARM program includes farm field-specific risk identification maps, an online real-time three day manure spreading runoff risk advisory, and interactive field-level risk assessment worksheet that helps a producer identify and mitigate risks associated with manure runoff. Recognizing the benefit of wide adoption of these tools, the WCD in Lynden, WA and Ministry of Agriculture in Abbottsford, B.C. are partnering together to adapt the tools for the Fraser Valley, B.C.. A pilot project is underway with Canadian agricultural producers to test and promote adoption of the ARM tools, as well as quantify the beneficial impacts of the ARM system to Canadian, and U.S., water quality. This effort has evolved through a collaborative partnership with agency and producer participation on both sides of the border accounting for differences in conservation practices, regulatory framework, economics, and social norms. The goal is that in partnership, we can reduce impacts from agriculture associated with nutrient use and improve water quality.

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Cross-boundary Collaboration on the Implementation of a Unique Manure Application Risk Management Tool for Water Quality Improvement

2016SSEC

Throughout the Puget Sound and Strait of Georgia regions (combined Salish Sea), impacted and poorly managed agriculture has repeatedly been advanced as a leading contributor to surface and ground water pollution. Both U.S. and Canadian producers and technical staff have recognized the need for a collaborative approach to addressing the problem. In particular, improvements in nutrient application methods and use of decision support tools are necessary to protect resources from further negative impacts. Studies conducted by the Whatcom Conservation District (WCD) in Washington have shown that strategic manure application practices and timing can significantly reduce the potential of nutrient runoff and leaching events. By utilizing a unique manure Application Risk Management (ARM) strategy that encourages applications be tailored to soil type and account for current field and weather conditions, a significant reduction in pollution potential can be realized as compared to “conventional” application practices. The ARM program includes farm field-specific risk identification maps, an online real-time three day manure spreading runoff risk advisory, and interactive field-level risk assessment worksheet that helps a producer identify and mitigate risks associated with manure runoff. Recognizing the benefit of wide adoption of these tools, the WCD in Lynden, WA and Ministry of Agriculture in Abbottsford, B.C. are partnering together to adapt the tools for the Fraser Valley, B.C.. A pilot project is underway with Canadian agricultural producers to test and promote adoption of the ARM tools, as well as quantify the beneficial impacts of the ARM system to Canadian, and U.S., water quality. This effort has evolved through a collaborative partnership with agency and producer participation on both sides of the border accounting for differences in conservation practices, regulatory framework, economics, and social norms. The goal is that in partnership, we can reduce impacts from agriculture associated with nutrient use and improve water quality.