Proposed Abstract Title

Waterfront Initiative: Developing Social-Ecological Indicators of Waterfront Health in a Cross Sector Collaborative Framework

Presenter/Author Information

Dan Straker, Georgia Strait AllianceFollow

Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Softening Borders through Information Exchange: Monitoring and Indicator- Efforts Within and Across Boundaries in the Salish Sea

Location

2016SSEC

Description

At the interface of land and water, the waterfront of Vancouver, BC shows the stresses of increasing urban densification, heightened climate change and growing land-use conflicts as a result of increasingly competing needs of stakeholders. As these stresses grow, integrated and innovative planning becomes ever more important. As of 2013 the city did not yet have an agreed upon vision for the use or protection of its waterfront nor did it have an appropriate structure to engage or work with a broad range of stakeholders to create a vision that reflected the diversity of land-use needs. In 2013, the Georgia Strait Alliance (GSA) launched the “Waterfront Initiative” establishing an innovative framework and strategy to build a collaborative vision for Vancouver’s waterfront and to ensure that vision becomes a reality.

Since it launched, the Initiative has worked diligently to build a shared vision, define a common agenda, and gain trust of stakeholders and citizens through hosting discussions, increasing both inter and intra-sector communication. Guided by the advice and needs of network members, our work in 2015 focused on data gathering and identifying gaps in knowledge about the waterfront. Following our most recent forum in March 2016, we have identified key measurable indicators that collectively reflect the state of Vancouver’s waterfront across five themes and act as the basis for setting shared goals, critical steps to achieving our vision. The five themes include: living (residential), working (industry and commerce), moving (transportation and shipping), playing (recreation and access to nature), and environment (healthy ecosystems and climate change). Dan Straker, GSA’s Waterfront Initiative Lead, will provide a brief overview of this innovative and collaborative approach to planning for social-ecological resilience in an urban context and outline the process of translating a data gathering exercise into measurable indicators in an open and collaborative framework.

Comments

Find more about the Waterfront Initiative at http://georgiastrait.org/work/waterfront-initiative/

Hard to tell exactly what session this presentation best belongs under, but I hope these two choices fit. If there are additional sessions that it may be better suited I'm open to submitting for those.

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Waterfront Initiative: Developing Social-Ecological Indicators of Waterfront Health in a Cross Sector Collaborative Framework

2016SSEC

At the interface of land and water, the waterfront of Vancouver, BC shows the stresses of increasing urban densification, heightened climate change and growing land-use conflicts as a result of increasingly competing needs of stakeholders. As these stresses grow, integrated and innovative planning becomes ever more important. As of 2013 the city did not yet have an agreed upon vision for the use or protection of its waterfront nor did it have an appropriate structure to engage or work with a broad range of stakeholders to create a vision that reflected the diversity of land-use needs. In 2013, the Georgia Strait Alliance (GSA) launched the “Waterfront Initiative” establishing an innovative framework and strategy to build a collaborative vision for Vancouver’s waterfront and to ensure that vision becomes a reality.

Since it launched, the Initiative has worked diligently to build a shared vision, define a common agenda, and gain trust of stakeholders and citizens through hosting discussions, increasing both inter and intra-sector communication. Guided by the advice and needs of network members, our work in 2015 focused on data gathering and identifying gaps in knowledge about the waterfront. Following our most recent forum in March 2016, we have identified key measurable indicators that collectively reflect the state of Vancouver’s waterfront across five themes and act as the basis for setting shared goals, critical steps to achieving our vision. The five themes include: living (residential), working (industry and commerce), moving (transportation and shipping), playing (recreation and access to nature), and environment (healthy ecosystems and climate change). Dan Straker, GSA’s Waterfront Initiative Lead, will provide a brief overview of this innovative and collaborative approach to planning for social-ecological resilience in an urban context and outline the process of translating a data gathering exercise into measurable indicators in an open and collaborative framework.