Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Governance of the Salish Sea: Can we develop a cross-border policy framework?

Description

Maintaining and improving water quality of compromised watersheds is exceedingly complex. In the case of the Green/Duwamish Watershed in King County, Washington a multi-disciplinary, trans-boundary ecosystem approach to addressing salmon recovery is being taken by local governments. We have found it paramount to take an integrated and collaborative approach to watershed planning, governance, and funding to solve complex water and land use issues to recover salmon populations. The Green/Duwamish salmon recovery approach includes establishing watershed level objectives and priorities, and integrating these objectives with community and economic development objectives. We believe that a multi-disciplinary, transboundary approach can yield outcomes with multiple benefits. Successful implementation of on-site projects and programmatic actions is only achieved in this watershed when there is a means for coordinating decisions among government and others to resolve land use and resource management conflicts and issues. Using experiences of the Green/Duwamish Watershed, (we) I will provide examples of identified barriers to and opportunities for collaboration that result in better outcomes. I will describe the principles of this approach, how it could allow practitioners to direct resources toward doing the right thing for their watershed, and how it could be applied in other locations that drain to the Salish Sea.

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Doing the right thing for your watersheds

2016SSEC

Maintaining and improving water quality of compromised watersheds is exceedingly complex. In the case of the Green/Duwamish Watershed in King County, Washington a multi-disciplinary, trans-boundary ecosystem approach to addressing salmon recovery is being taken by local governments. We have found it paramount to take an integrated and collaborative approach to watershed planning, governance, and funding to solve complex water and land use issues to recover salmon populations. The Green/Duwamish salmon recovery approach includes establishing watershed level objectives and priorities, and integrating these objectives with community and economic development objectives. We believe that a multi-disciplinary, transboundary approach can yield outcomes with multiple benefits. Successful implementation of on-site projects and programmatic actions is only achieved in this watershed when there is a means for coordinating decisions among government and others to resolve land use and resource management conflicts and issues. Using experiences of the Green/Duwamish Watershed, (we) I will provide examples of identified barriers to and opportunities for collaboration that result in better outcomes. I will describe the principles of this approach, how it could allow practitioners to direct resources toward doing the right thing for their watershed, and how it could be applied in other locations that drain to the Salish Sea.