Proposed Abstract Title

Puget Sound Pressures Assessment -- What stressors most affect Puget Sound recovery and long-term protection? How is this information being used?

Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Decision support tools to support adaptive management of Salish Sea restoration efforts

Location

2016SSEC

Description

The 2014 Puget Sound Pressures Assessment (PSPA) was an effort commissioned by the Puget Sound Partnership’s Science Panel to better understand the stressors on the Sound’s freshwater, marine-nearshore, and terrestrial resources and identify the critical vulnerabilities that should be addressed to ensure sustainable long-term protection and recovery. The assessment rated the vulnerability of 60 ‘endpoints’ – which are discrete species, habitat types, landforms, or ecological processes – to 47 ‘stressors’ – which are the human and natural processes that are the proximate agents for change to the Puget Sound ecosystem. Key findings include: stressors with the most potential for harm and endpoints that are most vulnerable to harm (intrinsic vulnerability), relative uncertainty about stressor-endpoint relationships, current stressor intensity for geographic assessment unit and Sound-wide, and potential impact of stressors at the assessment unit and Sound-wide scales. Two land cover conversion stressors and two non-point pollution stressors are highly rated in both intrinsic vulnerability and potential impact. Throughout 2015 Partnership staff used PSPA findings to update its evaluation of ecosystem recovery processes and communicated PSPA findings to guide a number of entities’ decisions about priority stressors and sources of stress. The Partnership has also begun to use the PSPA findings as the foundation of a climate vulnerability assessment. These uses of the PSPA findings provide insights into some of the benefits provided by the assessment, limitations and challenges in supporting decisions about priority stressors and sources of stress, and the most-pressing improvements to the 2014 effort and products.

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Puget Sound Pressures Assessment -- What stressors most affect Puget Sound recovery and long-term protection? How is this information being used?

2016SSEC

The 2014 Puget Sound Pressures Assessment (PSPA) was an effort commissioned by the Puget Sound Partnership’s Science Panel to better understand the stressors on the Sound’s freshwater, marine-nearshore, and terrestrial resources and identify the critical vulnerabilities that should be addressed to ensure sustainable long-term protection and recovery. The assessment rated the vulnerability of 60 ‘endpoints’ – which are discrete species, habitat types, landforms, or ecological processes – to 47 ‘stressors’ – which are the human and natural processes that are the proximate agents for change to the Puget Sound ecosystem. Key findings include: stressors with the most potential for harm and endpoints that are most vulnerable to harm (intrinsic vulnerability), relative uncertainty about stressor-endpoint relationships, current stressor intensity for geographic assessment unit and Sound-wide, and potential impact of stressors at the assessment unit and Sound-wide scales. Two land cover conversion stressors and two non-point pollution stressors are highly rated in both intrinsic vulnerability and potential impact. Throughout 2015 Partnership staff used PSPA findings to update its evaluation of ecosystem recovery processes and communicated PSPA findings to guide a number of entities’ decisions about priority stressors and sources of stress. The Partnership has also begun to use the PSPA findings as the foundation of a climate vulnerability assessment. These uses of the PSPA findings provide insights into some of the benefits provided by the assessment, limitations and challenges in supporting decisions about priority stressors and sources of stress, and the most-pressing improvements to the 2014 effort and products.