Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Toward Coordinated Resilience Planning Where People and Ecosystems are Being Squeezed by Climate Change

Description

Since 2006, the Estuary and Salmon Restoration Program (ESRP) has been helping create more resilient coastlines. Physical changes in Puget Sound have altered natural processes that impacts the web of life and puts communities at risk from floods and storms. Coastal wetlands need room to move inland as seas rise. Sediment-supplying bluffs need to be allowed to release their materials so beaches can be built up on eroding shorelines. While this is a great challenge of our time, we also understand that there is great opportunity to reshape our coastlines in a way that protects places for people and rebuilds habitat for wildlife. In order to protect our communities and restore natural ecosystem processes, ESRP is developing new regional strategies and publically available spatial datasets that will improve our understanding of where and how to protect and restore Puget Sound shorelines. In addition, we are working to tell better stories about how our work helps communities adapt to climate change. More than just a grant program, ESRP plays a unique role in advancing nearshore restoration, protection, and adaptive management plans for Puget Sound. Every two years, ESRP develops locally-driven sound-wide investment plans that request state and federal capital funding for large-scale nearshore ecosystem restoration and protection projects. This presentation will demonstrate how ESRP is helping create more resilient Puget Sound shorelines through acquisition, restoration construction, and science investigations.

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Improving Coastal Resiliency: Estuary and Salmon Restoration Program

2016SSEC

Since 2006, the Estuary and Salmon Restoration Program (ESRP) has been helping create more resilient coastlines. Physical changes in Puget Sound have altered natural processes that impacts the web of life and puts communities at risk from floods and storms. Coastal wetlands need room to move inland as seas rise. Sediment-supplying bluffs need to be allowed to release their materials so beaches can be built up on eroding shorelines. While this is a great challenge of our time, we also understand that there is great opportunity to reshape our coastlines in a way that protects places for people and rebuilds habitat for wildlife. In order to protect our communities and restore natural ecosystem processes, ESRP is developing new regional strategies and publically available spatial datasets that will improve our understanding of where and how to protect and restore Puget Sound shorelines. In addition, we are working to tell better stories about how our work helps communities adapt to climate change. More than just a grant program, ESRP plays a unique role in advancing nearshore restoration, protection, and adaptive management plans for Puget Sound. Every two years, ESRP develops locally-driven sound-wide investment plans that request state and federal capital funding for large-scale nearshore ecosystem restoration and protection projects. This presentation will demonstrate how ESRP is helping create more resilient Puget Sound shorelines through acquisition, restoration construction, and science investigations.