Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Decision support tools to support adaptive management of Salish Sea restoration efforts

Location

2016SSEC

Description

British Columbia’s vast coastline is characterized by ecologically rich, rugged, and remote regions where there are many uncertainties about the way that ecosystems function. This translates into a challenge for environmental managers, as it creates considerable uncertainty about which management actions will be most effective for achieving management goals and objectives. Adaptive management can offer a way forward by providing systematic, rigorous approach for designing and implementing management actions to maximize learning about critical uncertainties affecting decisions on environmental management policy and practice. It typically follows a six-step cycle focusing on the implementation and monitoring of management actions that are deliberately designed to reduce critical uncertainty, and adjusting management based on what is learned. In most cases, this approach relies heavily on interdisciplinary collaboration among scientists, managers, resource users, and the broader community. We showcase the application of an adaptive management mindset through three cases along the BC coast. The first is from the south coast, where stakeholders are working to assess options in the process of developing a strategic integrated management plan for Chinook salmon. The second is from the Kemano River on the central coast, where eulachon management is being informed by the evaluation of previous monitoring activities. The third is from the Skeena Estuary on the north coast, where recommendations for future data collection have been designed to address key uncertainties in the management of Pacific salmon. These stories showcase recent successes of applying an adaptive management way of thinking in the region and highlight how this approach can help to reduce critical uncertainties often cited as a barrier to the effective management of our coastal marine resources.

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Reducing Uncertainties in Managing in British Columbia Waters: Applying an Adaptive Management Mindset on the South, Central and North Coasts

2016SSEC

British Columbia’s vast coastline is characterized by ecologically rich, rugged, and remote regions where there are many uncertainties about the way that ecosystems function. This translates into a challenge for environmental managers, as it creates considerable uncertainty about which management actions will be most effective for achieving management goals and objectives. Adaptive management can offer a way forward by providing systematic, rigorous approach for designing and implementing management actions to maximize learning about critical uncertainties affecting decisions on environmental management policy and practice. It typically follows a six-step cycle focusing on the implementation and monitoring of management actions that are deliberately designed to reduce critical uncertainty, and adjusting management based on what is learned. In most cases, this approach relies heavily on interdisciplinary collaboration among scientists, managers, resource users, and the broader community. We showcase the application of an adaptive management mindset through three cases along the BC coast. The first is from the south coast, where stakeholders are working to assess options in the process of developing a strategic integrated management plan for Chinook salmon. The second is from the Kemano River on the central coast, where eulachon management is being informed by the evaluation of previous monitoring activities. The third is from the Skeena Estuary on the north coast, where recommendations for future data collection have been designed to address key uncertainties in the management of Pacific salmon. These stories showcase recent successes of applying an adaptive management way of thinking in the region and highlight how this approach can help to reduce critical uncertainties often cited as a barrier to the effective management of our coastal marine resources.