Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Toward Coordinated Resilience Planning Where People and Ecosystems are Being Squeezed by Climate Change

Description

A detailed three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was used to assess estuarine response to 22 potential restoration sites located within the Skagit River Delta as part of the Skagit Delta Hydrodynamic Modeling project. These sites were previously identified as restoration targets in the Skagit Chinook Recovery Plan. The overall objective is to develop a suite of projects that are well supported to achieve long-term viability of Chinook salmon tidal delta habitat and community flood risk reduction in a manner that protects and enhances agriculture and drainage. The existing Skagit Bay model developed previously by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory using finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) was refined achieving 10 meter resolution at the restoration sites. Bottom elevations of the model grid were also updated with recent high-resolution Lidar provided by the US Geological Survey (USGS) and boat surveys by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

Simulated tidal motion, circulation, and bed shear stress were driven by the tides, fresh-water discharge, and wind stress. The model was calibrated for water level at five gage stations maintained by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and seven stations maintained by the Skagit River System Cooperative (SRSC) throughout the 7-month simulation period from November 2014 to June 2015, encompassing the flood season and fish outmigration period. The model results were processed to generate quantitative information on areas of inundation, frequency of inundation, contour maps of depth, water surface elevation, salinity, and change in bed shear stress for various combinations of the 22 potential restoration actions. These results may be compared with the baseline conditions to assess feasibility of proposed restoration actions, evaluate cumulative benefits or impacts and address stakeholder concerns. This project is part of the Farm, Fish, and Flood Initiative (3FI) led by NOAA, WDFW, and The Nature Conservancy (TNC).

Comments

This presentation is closely tied with "Thinking Big: An Assessment of 22 Estuarine Restoration Concepts to Achieve Net Gain for Fish, Floods and Farms in the Skagit Delta", by Jenna Friebel. If selected, we would ask to present immediately after Jenna in the same session.

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Hydrodynamic Modeling to Assess Estuarine Response to Multiple Restoration Actions on the Skagit Delta

2016SSEC

A detailed three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was used to assess estuarine response to 22 potential restoration sites located within the Skagit River Delta as part of the Skagit Delta Hydrodynamic Modeling project. These sites were previously identified as restoration targets in the Skagit Chinook Recovery Plan. The overall objective is to develop a suite of projects that are well supported to achieve long-term viability of Chinook salmon tidal delta habitat and community flood risk reduction in a manner that protects and enhances agriculture and drainage. The existing Skagit Bay model developed previously by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory using finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) was refined achieving 10 meter resolution at the restoration sites. Bottom elevations of the model grid were also updated with recent high-resolution Lidar provided by the US Geological Survey (USGS) and boat surveys by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

Simulated tidal motion, circulation, and bed shear stress were driven by the tides, fresh-water discharge, and wind stress. The model was calibrated for water level at five gage stations maintained by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and seven stations maintained by the Skagit River System Cooperative (SRSC) throughout the 7-month simulation period from November 2014 to June 2015, encompassing the flood season and fish outmigration period. The model results were processed to generate quantitative information on areas of inundation, frequency of inundation, contour maps of depth, water surface elevation, salinity, and change in bed shear stress for various combinations of the 22 potential restoration actions. These results may be compared with the baseline conditions to assess feasibility of proposed restoration actions, evaluate cumulative benefits or impacts and address stakeholder concerns. This project is part of the Farm, Fish, and Flood Initiative (3FI) led by NOAA, WDFW, and The Nature Conservancy (TNC).