Proposed Abstract Title

Improving Habitat by Connecting Restoration Practitioners on the Lower Duwamish River, Seattle WA

Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Marine Ecosystem Restoration in the Urban Environment

Location

2016SSEC

Description

Not for the faint of heart, constructing habitat in urban watersheds is complex and requires flexibility in design and ongoing adaptive management for successful outcomes. A recent NOAA sponsored workshop for restoration practitioners involved in habitat restoration in the Lower Duwamish River shared on the ground lessons learned and promising techniques to address challenges. Field visits to sites were planned ahead of the workshop to several projects that ranged from the design phase to under construction to several years post-construction. Projects included a natural resource damage assessment restoration bank established through a public-private partnership (City of Seattle with Bluefield Holdings), a project constructed on private property as part of a NRDA settlement (Boeing), a salmon habitat project (King county and grant sponsors), and a city park/salmon habitat (City of Tukwila and WRIA 9). Design and construction challenges included soil/sediment contamination, archaeological considerations and permitting requirements that were very lengthy. Adaptive management issues post- construction have varied by project and included intense herbivory from geese and nutria, large amounts of debris washing up on sites, greater than anticipated small boat-wake energy resulting in erosion, groundwater seeps, and impacts from homeless encampments. Participants discussed promising techniques to address these challenges and ways to include public access while protecting habitat functions. Overall, urban watershed projects benefit from shared knowledge between restoration practitioners, persistence, flexibility in design and implementation, realistic funding levels, coordination across permitting agencies, innovative approaches and potentially a staged approach to construction.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Improving Habitat by Connecting Restoration Practitioners on the Lower Duwamish River, Seattle WA

2016SSEC

Not for the faint of heart, constructing habitat in urban watersheds is complex and requires flexibility in design and ongoing adaptive management for successful outcomes. A recent NOAA sponsored workshop for restoration practitioners involved in habitat restoration in the Lower Duwamish River shared on the ground lessons learned and promising techniques to address challenges. Field visits to sites were planned ahead of the workshop to several projects that ranged from the design phase to under construction to several years post-construction. Projects included a natural resource damage assessment restoration bank established through a public-private partnership (City of Seattle with Bluefield Holdings), a project constructed on private property as part of a NRDA settlement (Boeing), a salmon habitat project (King county and grant sponsors), and a city park/salmon habitat (City of Tukwila and WRIA 9). Design and construction challenges included soil/sediment contamination, archaeological considerations and permitting requirements that were very lengthy. Adaptive management issues post- construction have varied by project and included intense herbivory from geese and nutria, large amounts of debris washing up on sites, greater than anticipated small boat-wake energy resulting in erosion, groundwater seeps, and impacts from homeless encampments. Participants discussed promising techniques to address these challenges and ways to include public access while protecting habitat functions. Overall, urban watershed projects benefit from shared knowledge between restoration practitioners, persistence, flexibility in design and implementation, realistic funding levels, coordination across permitting agencies, innovative approaches and potentially a staged approach to construction.