Proposed Abstract Title

Seasonal use of the Nisqually Reach and estuary by hatchery-reared Chinook salmon from throughout Puget Sound

Type of Presentation

Snapshot

Session Title

Habitat

Location

2016SSEC

Description

We used coded-wire tag (CWT) recoveries to analyze seasonal and yearly information on the origin, distribution, and habitat use by age-0 Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) reared in hatcheries and captured from the Nisqually River estuary and Nisqually Reach Aquatic Reserve (South Puget Sound). Management in both areas is focused on improving habitats for an array of species, particularly Chinook salmon. Fish were collected over five years using a beach seine or lampara net to sample tideflat and nearshore habitats, while a fyke net was used to sample marsh habitats. Data from more than 600 CWT’s recovered from fish released at 14 different hatcheries suggested that most hatchery fish used the area during late-spring and early-summer with declining numbers by mid- to late-summer. Overall, 72% (5-year range 62-81%) of the tags were recovered from fish released into streams that flow into south Puget Sound (south basin) while 28% (range 19-38%) were from fish originating in more northern (out-basin) areas. Tag data revealed a regular and annual pattern where south basin fish dominated the catch in spring and early summer while the late-summer catch was primarily composed of out-basin fish. The three habitats monitored were regularly used by hatchery fish; however, out-basin fish were less common in the emergent marsh (11% of the catch) than in delta (39%) or nearshore (28%) habitats. Conclusions about fish origin sometimes varied with sampling method and during late-summer the percentage of out-basin fish captured with the lampara net was nearly twice as great as the percentage captured with the beach seine. Our analyses indicated that age-0 Chinook salmon from watersheds nearby and far-afield (>100 km) used an array of habitats in the Nisqually Reach/estuary and point to the need to preserve and enhance this and other essential habitats in Puget Sound.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Seasonal use of the Nisqually Reach and estuary by hatchery-reared Chinook salmon from throughout Puget Sound

2016SSEC

We used coded-wire tag (CWT) recoveries to analyze seasonal and yearly information on the origin, distribution, and habitat use by age-0 Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) reared in hatcheries and captured from the Nisqually River estuary and Nisqually Reach Aquatic Reserve (South Puget Sound). Management in both areas is focused on improving habitats for an array of species, particularly Chinook salmon. Fish were collected over five years using a beach seine or lampara net to sample tideflat and nearshore habitats, while a fyke net was used to sample marsh habitats. Data from more than 600 CWT’s recovered from fish released at 14 different hatcheries suggested that most hatchery fish used the area during late-spring and early-summer with declining numbers by mid- to late-summer. Overall, 72% (5-year range 62-81%) of the tags were recovered from fish released into streams that flow into south Puget Sound (south basin) while 28% (range 19-38%) were from fish originating in more northern (out-basin) areas. Tag data revealed a regular and annual pattern where south basin fish dominated the catch in spring and early summer while the late-summer catch was primarily composed of out-basin fish. The three habitats monitored were regularly used by hatchery fish; however, out-basin fish were less common in the emergent marsh (11% of the catch) than in delta (39%) or nearshore (28%) habitats. Conclusions about fish origin sometimes varied with sampling method and during late-summer the percentage of out-basin fish captured with the lampara net was nearly twice as great as the percentage captured with the beach seine. Our analyses indicated that age-0 Chinook salmon from watersheds nearby and far-afield (>100 km) used an array of habitats in the Nisqually Reach/estuary and point to the need to preserve and enhance this and other essential habitats in Puget Sound.