Type of Presentation

Snapshot

Session Title

Local Stories and Results

Description

Shellfish aquaculture can result in conflicts among stakeholders who perceive impacts and tradeoffs relating to sense of place, aesthetic, recreational, economic, and ecological values. Pacific geoduck clams (Panopea generosa Gould 1850) are grown in intertidal plots using techniques that are both gear- and labor-intensive and result in a high-value export product that supports growing international markets. A confluence of issues has resulted in protracted and ongoing social and legal tensions surrounding geoduck aquaculture in southern Puget Sound, Washington (WA), USA. Using interviews and document analysis, we explored stakeholder perspectives and policy issues related to geoduck aquaculture in Puget Sound. Twenty three stakeholders were interviewed, including state agency employees, representatives of the aquaculture industry, non-governmental organizations, landowners, a tribal member, and an academic. Nine state Hearings Boards decisions on challenges to the aquaculture permitting process were also analyzed. Stakeholders articulated a variety of perspectives regarding aesthetic, recreational, land-use, ecological, political, regulatory, and economic aspects of geoduck aquaculture activities. Hearings Board cases addressed similar issues (aesthetic, ecological, and recreational), as well as challenges to restrictions on aquaculture. Potential strategies for managing the conflict include emphasizing best management practices, identifying and incorporating best available science, joint fact-finding approaches, and initiating and improving communication among all stakeholders.

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Digging deep: managing social and policy dimensions of geoduck aquaculture conflict in Puget Sound, Washington

2016SSEC

Shellfish aquaculture can result in conflicts among stakeholders who perceive impacts and tradeoffs relating to sense of place, aesthetic, recreational, economic, and ecological values. Pacific geoduck clams (Panopea generosa Gould 1850) are grown in intertidal plots using techniques that are both gear- and labor-intensive and result in a high-value export product that supports growing international markets. A confluence of issues has resulted in protracted and ongoing social and legal tensions surrounding geoduck aquaculture in southern Puget Sound, Washington (WA), USA. Using interviews and document analysis, we explored stakeholder perspectives and policy issues related to geoduck aquaculture in Puget Sound. Twenty three stakeholders were interviewed, including state agency employees, representatives of the aquaculture industry, non-governmental organizations, landowners, a tribal member, and an academic. Nine state Hearings Boards decisions on challenges to the aquaculture permitting process were also analyzed. Stakeholders articulated a variety of perspectives regarding aesthetic, recreational, land-use, ecological, political, regulatory, and economic aspects of geoduck aquaculture activities. Hearings Board cases addressed similar issues (aesthetic, ecological, and recreational), as well as challenges to restrictions on aquaculture. Potential strategies for managing the conflict include emphasizing best management practices, identifying and incorporating best available science, joint fact-finding approaches, and initiating and improving communication among all stakeholders.