Type of Presentation

Snapshot

Session Title

Climate change and ocean acidification

Description

The last few decades have witnessed an escalating number of extreme climate events such as changes in air and water temperatures; precipitation patterns; storm intensity, duration, frequency and distribution; oceanic and atmospheric circulation; and altered timing of seasons. The acceleration of climate change impacts is expected to amplify the existing coastal flooding risks and vulnerabilities associated with storm surges and sea level rise.

Situated at the interface between land and ocean, green infrastructure – natural areas of individual or combination of soft structures, coastal vegetation, and reef systems – provides important coastal protection services. Increased amount of primary research provides evidence that green infrastructure is an effective low-impact and low-cost method of reducing coastal flooding risks and building resilience. Yet their practical implementations have been significantly limited due to the incomplete understanding of their potential flood protection benefits in local/regional scales, because coastal protection decisions require a place-specific understanding of green infrastructure’s potential flood protection benefits. It is also equally important to understand green infrastructure’s vulnerability to changing environmental conditions, such as climate change stressors and human action at coast, because its ability to respond to these stressors directly influences its potential to provide flood protection benefits. This research develops a green infrastructure specific classification system for the 80 most populated coastal communities (50 in British Columbia and 30 in Washington State) in the Salish Sea region. This descriptive and informative tool (1) maps the regional distribution of green infrastructure, (2) displays regional green infrastructure categories based on criteria, and (3) identifies patterns of green infrastructure vulnerability and its potential benefits in reducing coastal flooding risks in the Salish Sea.

This talk will present the results of the green infrastructure classification model, and will discuss patterns of green infrastructure vulnerability and protection benefits in the Salish Sea region.

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Classification of green infrastructure networks in the Salish Sea to build regional resilience to coastal flooding

2016SSEC

The last few decades have witnessed an escalating number of extreme climate events such as changes in air and water temperatures; precipitation patterns; storm intensity, duration, frequency and distribution; oceanic and atmospheric circulation; and altered timing of seasons. The acceleration of climate change impacts is expected to amplify the existing coastal flooding risks and vulnerabilities associated with storm surges and sea level rise.

Situated at the interface between land and ocean, green infrastructure – natural areas of individual or combination of soft structures, coastal vegetation, and reef systems – provides important coastal protection services. Increased amount of primary research provides evidence that green infrastructure is an effective low-impact and low-cost method of reducing coastal flooding risks and building resilience. Yet their practical implementations have been significantly limited due to the incomplete understanding of their potential flood protection benefits in local/regional scales, because coastal protection decisions require a place-specific understanding of green infrastructure’s potential flood protection benefits. It is also equally important to understand green infrastructure’s vulnerability to changing environmental conditions, such as climate change stressors and human action at coast, because its ability to respond to these stressors directly influences its potential to provide flood protection benefits. This research develops a green infrastructure specific classification system for the 80 most populated coastal communities (50 in British Columbia and 30 in Washington State) in the Salish Sea region. This descriptive and informative tool (1) maps the regional distribution of green infrastructure, (2) displays regional green infrastructure categories based on criteria, and (3) identifies patterns of green infrastructure vulnerability and its potential benefits in reducing coastal flooding risks in the Salish Sea.

This talk will present the results of the green infrastructure classification model, and will discuss patterns of green infrastructure vulnerability and protection benefits in the Salish Sea region.