Presenter/Author Information

Kate E. Emmings, Islands TrustFollow

Type of Presentation

Snapshot

Session Title

Mapping and Data

Description

Nothing generates conversations between landowners and local government like a map! Shoreline mapping is a crucial decision making tool for local governments and regulators. It provides information about appropriate location of shoreline infrastructure, such as docks, and informs landowners about the location of important natural transition areas between the land and the sea. Maps can also provide information that limits the activities of private landowners and as such can cause community conflict if they are inaccurate or unclear. Because mapping can be used to inform regulation, local governments often have different needs than scientists and NGOs, but there is no reason that mapping projects cannot accommodate multiple parties.

The Islands Trust and Islands Trust Fund considered accuracy, methodology and budget when mapping eelgrass and forage fish habitats for the island in the Salish Sea and elected to work in partnership with two non-profit agencies – SeaChange Marine Conservation Society and the BC Marine Conservation and Research Society – to complete habitat mapping. Each of the project partners had specific and overlapping mapping needs. Collaboration resulted in cost-savings for all organizations as well as a dataset that accommodated multiple needs. The dataset is now one of the most requested data sets Islands Trust staff has seen in recent years. The mapping has been shared with other government agencies, NGOs and private industry and is being used to record habitat locations, plan and regulate shoreline uses, inform marine conservation areas and respond to emergencies.

This Salish Sea Snapshot presentation will discuss the needs of local governments when mapping habitat, the advantages and challenges of collaboration with non-profits to complete mapping and ways to meet the needs of local governments, non-profit agencies and scientists to create a useful product.

Comments

Presenter information:

Kate Emmings works as the Ecosystem Protection Specialist with the Islands Trust Fund, the Conservancy for over 650 islands in Canada’s Salish Sea. As a branch of the Islands Trust, the local government for the area, the Islands Trust Fund works closely with island governments to protect nature on the land and at the edge of the sea. Kate has lived among the islands in the Salish Sea for 23 years and lives on Galiano Island. For more information about the Islands Trust Fund visit www.islandstrustfund.bc.ca.

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Mapping on the Edge: shoreline mapping for regulation and voluntary stewardship

2016SSEC

Nothing generates conversations between landowners and local government like a map! Shoreline mapping is a crucial decision making tool for local governments and regulators. It provides information about appropriate location of shoreline infrastructure, such as docks, and informs landowners about the location of important natural transition areas between the land and the sea. Maps can also provide information that limits the activities of private landowners and as such can cause community conflict if they are inaccurate or unclear. Because mapping can be used to inform regulation, local governments often have different needs than scientists and NGOs, but there is no reason that mapping projects cannot accommodate multiple parties.

The Islands Trust and Islands Trust Fund considered accuracy, methodology and budget when mapping eelgrass and forage fish habitats for the island in the Salish Sea and elected to work in partnership with two non-profit agencies – SeaChange Marine Conservation Society and the BC Marine Conservation and Research Society – to complete habitat mapping. Each of the project partners had specific and overlapping mapping needs. Collaboration resulted in cost-savings for all organizations as well as a dataset that accommodated multiple needs. The dataset is now one of the most requested data sets Islands Trust staff has seen in recent years. The mapping has been shared with other government agencies, NGOs and private industry and is being used to record habitat locations, plan and regulate shoreline uses, inform marine conservation areas and respond to emergencies.

This Salish Sea Snapshot presentation will discuss the needs of local governments when mapping habitat, the advantages and challenges of collaboration with non-profits to complete mapping and ways to meet the needs of local governments, non-profit agencies and scientists to create a useful product.