Proposed Abstract Title

Benefits of Working with Local Governments - A Non-Profit Perspective

Type of Presentation

Snapshot

Session Title

Social and Policy Interconnections

Location

2016SSEC

Description

Land use developments within watersheds have led to a loss of natural estuarine and nearshore marine habitats in British Columbia - the receiving waters of land based activities. Agriculture, forestry, and dredging for commercial and residential development have all contributed to the loss. The pressure to modify natural marine features and habitat for the development of commercial facilities and residential units within coastal areas is intensifying. As well, marine activities are directly affecting nearshore habitats.

To prepare for the increase in populations on the BC coast and concurrent shoreline developments, it is necessary to identify and quantify nearshore habitats and restore them where possible, and to investigate strategies to restore lost or damaged habitats from historical industrial practices.

To this end, SeaChange Marine Conservation Society partnered with Islands Trust Fund to inventory eelgrass habitats surrounding the 13 islands within the Islands Trust jurisdiction from 2012-2014. The benefits of such a working relationship resulted in high quality maps that are used to better inform decisions affecting nearshores in the Salish Sea. This presentation will elaborate on these benefits to coastal community governments, residents and ultimately eelgrass nearshore habitats.

Comments

Presenters: Leanna Boyer and Nikki Wright have worked together since 2001 to map and restore nearshore habitats through SeaChange, a non-profit marine conservation society based outside of Victoria, BC.. We work with all levels of government, First Nations and coastal communities through hands on mapping and restoration projects and in settings as diverse as school rooms and mudflats.

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Benefits of Working with Local Governments - A Non-Profit Perspective

2016SSEC

Land use developments within watersheds have led to a loss of natural estuarine and nearshore marine habitats in British Columbia - the receiving waters of land based activities. Agriculture, forestry, and dredging for commercial and residential development have all contributed to the loss. The pressure to modify natural marine features and habitat for the development of commercial facilities and residential units within coastal areas is intensifying. As well, marine activities are directly affecting nearshore habitats.

To prepare for the increase in populations on the BC coast and concurrent shoreline developments, it is necessary to identify and quantify nearshore habitats and restore them where possible, and to investigate strategies to restore lost or damaged habitats from historical industrial practices.

To this end, SeaChange Marine Conservation Society partnered with Islands Trust Fund to inventory eelgrass habitats surrounding the 13 islands within the Islands Trust jurisdiction from 2012-2014. The benefits of such a working relationship resulted in high quality maps that are used to better inform decisions affecting nearshores in the Salish Sea. This presentation will elaborate on these benefits to coastal community governments, residents and ultimately eelgrass nearshore habitats.