Proposed Abstract Title

Emerald Sea Protection Project

Type of Presentation

Snapshot

Session Title

Habitat

Location

2016SSEC

Description

The Emerald Sea Protection Project (ESPP) is a civilian led initiative to identify, survey and remove abandoned, lost and/or discarded fishing gear (ALDFG) along the Canadian Pacific Coast. The plan of operations has three stages:

  • modelling probable ALDFG distribution

  • confirmation of ALDFG presence predicted by this model

  • recovery and disposal of salvaged materials.

This method will be applied at various scales over the course of a multi-phase project. In this, the first phase, the objective is to provide a ‘proof of concept’ on a small scale and establish our approach as a viable Canadian solution to this issue.

Our presentation will initially describe the need for this work and identify the scale and impact ALDFG has on marine ecology, specifically in the Canadian Salish Sea.

We will illustrate our methods for identifying these likely problem areas for ALDFG using a combination of fishing data, sea current modelling as well as sea-bed topography to establish three test sites as suitable for the initial surveying. With over 25,000 km of coastline to assess and very little reliable data available, the proper identification of these “hot spots” is both crucial and valuable.

The presentation will go on to explain our current work and initial findings in surveying these areas. Survey methods will be described, which we anticipate will incorporate Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs), side scan sonar and commercially trained divers to confirm locations and to survey the ALDFG.

Finally we will outline proposed expansions for the project. Initially we will highlight the limitations of the first phase emphasizing the importance and potential benefits of collaboration with other groups working in the same field as well as their potential to provide us with support. Additionally we will discuss proposed recovery/disposal techniques, educational opportunities and future goals for the initiative.

Comments

Key words:

Abandoned, Lost, Discarded Fishing Gear (ALDFG)

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Emerald Sea Protection Project

2016SSEC

The Emerald Sea Protection Project (ESPP) is a civilian led initiative to identify, survey and remove abandoned, lost and/or discarded fishing gear (ALDFG) along the Canadian Pacific Coast. The plan of operations has three stages:

  • modelling probable ALDFG distribution

  • confirmation of ALDFG presence predicted by this model

  • recovery and disposal of salvaged materials.

This method will be applied at various scales over the course of a multi-phase project. In this, the first phase, the objective is to provide a ‘proof of concept’ on a small scale and establish our approach as a viable Canadian solution to this issue.

Our presentation will initially describe the need for this work and identify the scale and impact ALDFG has on marine ecology, specifically in the Canadian Salish Sea.

We will illustrate our methods for identifying these likely problem areas for ALDFG using a combination of fishing data, sea current modelling as well as sea-bed topography to establish three test sites as suitable for the initial surveying. With over 25,000 km of coastline to assess and very little reliable data available, the proper identification of these “hot spots” is both crucial and valuable.

The presentation will go on to explain our current work and initial findings in surveying these areas. Survey methods will be described, which we anticipate will incorporate Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs), side scan sonar and commercially trained divers to confirm locations and to survey the ALDFG.

Finally we will outline proposed expansions for the project. Initially we will highlight the limitations of the first phase emphasizing the importance and potential benefits of collaboration with other groups working in the same field as well as their potential to provide us with support. Additionally we will discuss proposed recovery/disposal techniques, educational opportunities and future goals for the initiative.