Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Integrating Science with Landowner Outreach to Increase Coastal Resiliency

Description

Since 2011, the EPA-supported Marine and Nearshore Grant Program has funded more than 45 projects related to Puget Sound nearshore protection and restoration. Close to a third of these projects focused, either directly or indirectly, on the impacts of shoreline armoring. This presentation describes work by the University of Washington Puget Sound Institute to synthesize and communicate results from these grants, with an emphasis on 12 shoreline armoring-related research and outreach efforts. These grant results taken together provide a ‘big picture’ of ongoing work to decrease the amount of shoreline armoring in Puget Sound. We describe an effort to communicate these results to a variety of audiences, and look at key stories and trends, such as: 1) the importance of scientific findings related to the biological impacts of shoreline armoring; 2) lack of compliance with shoreline armoring regulations; 3) outreach and marketing efforts to bring property owners into compliance with regulations and best practices related to shoreline development; 4) a look at ways that erosion influences shoreline armoring—the good and the perceived bad—in the context of feeder bluffs and drift cells; 5) the projected impacts of sea level rise as it relates to armoring; and 6) case studies illustrating new green shoreline development in relation to the Marine Shoreline Design Guidelines.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Connecting shoreline armoring studies in Puget Sound

2016SSEC

Since 2011, the EPA-supported Marine and Nearshore Grant Program has funded more than 45 projects related to Puget Sound nearshore protection and restoration. Close to a third of these projects focused, either directly or indirectly, on the impacts of shoreline armoring. This presentation describes work by the University of Washington Puget Sound Institute to synthesize and communicate results from these grants, with an emphasis on 12 shoreline armoring-related research and outreach efforts. These grant results taken together provide a ‘big picture’ of ongoing work to decrease the amount of shoreline armoring in Puget Sound. We describe an effort to communicate these results to a variety of audiences, and look at key stories and trends, such as: 1) the importance of scientific findings related to the biological impacts of shoreline armoring; 2) lack of compliance with shoreline armoring regulations; 3) outreach and marketing efforts to bring property owners into compliance with regulations and best practices related to shoreline development; 4) a look at ways that erosion influences shoreline armoring—the good and the perceived bad—in the context of feeder bluffs and drift cells; 5) the projected impacts of sea level rise as it relates to armoring; and 6) case studies illustrating new green shoreline development in relation to the Marine Shoreline Design Guidelines.