Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

Protecting Natural Shoreline Functions with Existing Regulations and New Approaches

Description

Between 2011 and 2014, the Puget Sound Marine and Nearshore Grant Program funded twelve projects relating to shoreline regulatory and incentive programs. Here we provide an overview of overarching themes that emerged from a review of the projects in aggregate. Despite the different approaches to problem identification, data collection, and analysis in these investigations, the conclusions reached and recommendations made are remarkably similar. Key findings and implications of our analysis relate to: (1) armoring compliance rates; (2) compliance monitoring methodologies; (3) local Shoreline Master Program (SMP) capacity limitations; (4) SMP implementation improvements; and (5) incentive programs to encourage the use of alternative shore protection techniques. This type of synthesis and analysis of program results is a critical component of adaptive management. Findings are being used to inform next steps for Puget Sound recovery efforts funded under the National Estuary Program.

Comments

Full project report available on the Encyclopedia of Puget Sound:

http://www.eopugetsound.org/articles/review-puget-sound-marine-and-nearshore-grant-program-results-part-1

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Synthesis of Results from Twelve Puget Sound Regulatory Effectiveness and Incentive Investigations

2016SSEC

Between 2011 and 2014, the Puget Sound Marine and Nearshore Grant Program funded twelve projects relating to shoreline regulatory and incentive programs. Here we provide an overview of overarching themes that emerged from a review of the projects in aggregate. Despite the different approaches to problem identification, data collection, and analysis in these investigations, the conclusions reached and recommendations made are remarkably similar. Key findings and implications of our analysis relate to: (1) armoring compliance rates; (2) compliance monitoring methodologies; (3) local Shoreline Master Program (SMP) capacity limitations; (4) SMP implementation improvements; and (5) incentive programs to encourage the use of alternative shore protection techniques. This type of synthesis and analysis of program results is a critical component of adaptive management. Findings are being used to inform next steps for Puget Sound recovery efforts funded under the National Estuary Program.