Type of Presentation

Poster

Session Title

General species and food webs

Location

2016SSEC

Description

The discovery of several populations of an invasive Asian clam (corbicula fluminea) in Lake Whatcom, the drinking water source for approximately 100,000 people in Northern Washington State, created a need among elected officials, local government staff, and the public for a better understanding of lake hydrodynamics during the reproductive season for the Asian clam, and for times when Quagga and Zebra mussel invasions are likely. Seasonal vertical thermal stratification of the lake and a desire to predict likely locations of additional clam populations or of new populations of mussels led to the choice of a model that could be configured for three-dimensional hydrodynamic analysis to predict likely trajectories of larvae after spawning. The General Estuarine Transport Model (GETM) was chosen. GETM is a standard model widely used for near-shore oceanographic modelling where stratification and steep bottom topography are similar to the physical conditions in Lake Whatcom. Because application of this work to an estuarine environment would be straightforward--requiring the specification of open boundaries, the input of tidal elevations at open boundaries, and salinity profiles--it serves as a platform for similar studies of invasive species in the Salish Sea.

Comments

Keywords: Lake Whatcom, dispersal, clams, invasive species, application, hydrodynamics, estuarine, ecosystems

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Simulating the Dispersal of Invasive Clams in a Freshwater Lake Using a Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Model; a prototype for Simulating Invasions in Marine Ecosystems

2016SSEC

The discovery of several populations of an invasive Asian clam (corbicula fluminea) in Lake Whatcom, the drinking water source for approximately 100,000 people in Northern Washington State, created a need among elected officials, local government staff, and the public for a better understanding of lake hydrodynamics during the reproductive season for the Asian clam, and for times when Quagga and Zebra mussel invasions are likely. Seasonal vertical thermal stratification of the lake and a desire to predict likely locations of additional clam populations or of new populations of mussels led to the choice of a model that could be configured for three-dimensional hydrodynamic analysis to predict likely trajectories of larvae after spawning. The General Estuarine Transport Model (GETM) was chosen. GETM is a standard model widely used for near-shore oceanographic modelling where stratification and steep bottom topography are similar to the physical conditions in Lake Whatcom. Because application of this work to an estuarine environment would be straightforward--requiring the specification of open boundaries, the input of tidal elevations at open boundaries, and salinity profiles--it serves as a platform for similar studies of invasive species in the Salish Sea.