Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

From Conversation to Conservation Action: Balancing Endangered Species Protection and Growth on BC's South Coast

Description

The Little Campbell River (LCR), historically known as Tatalu by the Semiahmoo First Nation, is one of the last remaining undyked lowland rivers in the Salish Sea region. Retaining a high level of intact fish and wildlife habitat, and home to a large number of aquatic and terrestrial species at risk, the LCR flows into Semiahmoo Bay, part of the Fraser River Delta; the Delta is a Wetland of International Importance (Ramsar site) and one of Canada’s top-rated Important Bird Areas.

A Rocha Canada has taken a watershed approach to improve the management, protection and restoration of ecosystem function and species at risk populations through collaborative conservation actions and the development of a Watershed Stewardship Plan. The Plan, developed with input from multiple stakeholders, spatially delineates priority habitats for protection or restoration, outlines monitoring plans for multiple species at risk, assigns roles and responsibilities of partners to implement the plan, and proposes goals and timelines to protect or restore target amounts of habitat on a watershed scale. Since this is a transboundary watershed, extending into Washington State and crossing multiple jurisdictions within Canada, A Rocha is uniquely positioned to help facilitate collaborative initiatives in partnership with multiple stakeholders, community members and decision makers throughout the watershed.

This presentation highlights a few examples of collaborative projects within the LCR watershed, including showcasing the Watershed Stewardship Plan, and a report card to communicate and monitor watershed health over time.

Comments

Author Information: Christy Juteau, RPBio

A Rocha Canada’s Stewardship Co-ordinator, Christy is a professional biologist interested in seeing on-the-ground conservation and restoration of ecosystems through partnerships and effective projects. She has a diploma of technology in Renewable Resource Management (BCIT) and a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Science (RRU). Most of her work over the past ten years has focused on watershed restoration and research in the south coast of BC. Specifically, projects have involved riparian restoration, urban watershed assessment, invasive species, water quality, and fisheries management in small lakes. She is part of the Shared Waters Alliance – an international working group to protect water quality in Boundary Bay. Christy knows the Little Campbell Watershed well as she helped lead a watershed characterization and bacteriology study during her work with the BC Ministry of Environment and continues to work towards conservation of this watershed from a non-profit stewardship perspective with A Rocha Canada.

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Tatalu: a transboundary watershed approach to species at risk conservation

2016SSEC

The Little Campbell River (LCR), historically known as Tatalu by the Semiahmoo First Nation, is one of the last remaining undyked lowland rivers in the Salish Sea region. Retaining a high level of intact fish and wildlife habitat, and home to a large number of aquatic and terrestrial species at risk, the LCR flows into Semiahmoo Bay, part of the Fraser River Delta; the Delta is a Wetland of International Importance (Ramsar site) and one of Canada’s top-rated Important Bird Areas.

A Rocha Canada has taken a watershed approach to improve the management, protection and restoration of ecosystem function and species at risk populations through collaborative conservation actions and the development of a Watershed Stewardship Plan. The Plan, developed with input from multiple stakeholders, spatially delineates priority habitats for protection or restoration, outlines monitoring plans for multiple species at risk, assigns roles and responsibilities of partners to implement the plan, and proposes goals and timelines to protect or restore target amounts of habitat on a watershed scale. Since this is a transboundary watershed, extending into Washington State and crossing multiple jurisdictions within Canada, A Rocha is uniquely positioned to help facilitate collaborative initiatives in partnership with multiple stakeholders, community members and decision makers throughout the watershed.

This presentation highlights a few examples of collaborative projects within the LCR watershed, including showcasing the Watershed Stewardship Plan, and a report card to communicate and monitor watershed health over time.