Type of Presentation

Oral

Session Title

The Salish Sea Marine Survival Project- Novel Approaches, Project Status and Key Findings

Description

Early Marine Survival (EMS) and Early Marine Habitat Use (EMHU) of Chinook and Coho salmon in the Salish Sea will be influenced by both bottom-up and top-down mechanisms with water property variability and the resultant food availability expected to be critical bottom-up factors. To improve on our understanding of these mechanisms it is critical to monitor the water properties and the ecosystem on both temporal and spatial scales appropriate to understand nutrient cycling, variability in food supply (phytoplankton and zooplankton), the movements of fish and their predators, and ultimately the survival rate and the primary factors controlling this survival rate. Here we report on a study in Cowichan Bay, BC, where we made use of fixed moorings equipped with sensors to monitor water properties and water movement continuously for a 12 month period from April 2014 to April 2015 while the water column biology, including phytoplankton, zooplankton, fish and marine mammals were monitored using a bottom-mounted multi-frequency acoustical backscatter sonar system from May to August 2015. Combining these data we present a conceptual model of how changes in the physical and chemical properties modulate ecosystem dynamics in the bay.

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Multi-Scale Ecosystem Observations in Cowichan Bay, BC

2016SSEC

Early Marine Survival (EMS) and Early Marine Habitat Use (EMHU) of Chinook and Coho salmon in the Salish Sea will be influenced by both bottom-up and top-down mechanisms with water property variability and the resultant food availability expected to be critical bottom-up factors. To improve on our understanding of these mechanisms it is critical to monitor the water properties and the ecosystem on both temporal and spatial scales appropriate to understand nutrient cycling, variability in food supply (phytoplankton and zooplankton), the movements of fish and their predators, and ultimately the survival rate and the primary factors controlling this survival rate. Here we report on a study in Cowichan Bay, BC, where we made use of fixed moorings equipped with sensors to monitor water properties and water movement continuously for a 12 month period from April 2014 to April 2015 while the water column biology, including phytoplankton, zooplankton, fish and marine mammals were monitored using a bottom-mounted multi-frequency acoustical backscatter sonar system from May to August 2015. Combining these data we present a conceptual model of how changes in the physical and chemical properties modulate ecosystem dynamics in the bay.