Type of Presentation

Poster

Session Title

The Salish Sea Marine Survival Project- Novel Approaches, Project Status and Key Findings

Description

Marine nearshores are typically very productive, supporting the early life stages of invertebrates and recreational and commercial fish and shellfish populations. They are important contributors to the survival of threatened and endangered species.

Sediment impacted by wood waste in shallow marine subtidal areas utilized for log storage can result in impaired productive habitat, interrupting or preventing the early marine survival of salmon populations. Prime examples are many former log boom sites within the southern Salish Sea, including areas in Howe Sound, Squamish, Nanaimo and Cowichan estuaries, and Sechelt Inlet. (Wright, 2014)

Wood waste, as it accumulates and settles on subtidal and intertidal substrates, negatively impacts the saltwater environment physically, chemically, and biologically. Over time, the waste can decay into smaller, sometimes fibrous particles, mixing with sediment and affecting the benthic community by decreasing availability and diversity (Kendall and Michelsen, 1997).

SeaChange has been transplanting Z. marina in former log boom sites since 2005. To increase the likelihood of success at these sites, it would be beneficial to restoration efforts if research could be initiated to address conditions common in impacted log storage sites. Applied science research is planned for the summer of 1016 to investigate questions such as:

  1. How does Zostera marina adapt to changes in oxygen levels in the sediment and how can this adaptation to anaerobiosis be enhanced?
  2. What is the tolerance level of Z. marina to the presence of hydrogen sulfides? Can the impacts be mitigated on a small and affordable scale to enhance restoration?
  3. Can the degree of wood waste degradation be measured in the field to determine the suitability of the sediment for the restoration of Z. marina?

Wright, N. 2013-2015 Final Report: Salish Sea Nearshore Conservation Project, 2015.

Kendall, D., and T. Michelsen. 1997. Management of wood waste under dredged material management programs (DMMP) and the sediment management standards (SMS) cleanup program. Seattle District, ACOE, and Washington Department of Ecology.

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Eelgrass Restoration - A Progress Report from the Southern Salish Sea

2016SSEC

Marine nearshores are typically very productive, supporting the early life stages of invertebrates and recreational and commercial fish and shellfish populations. They are important contributors to the survival of threatened and endangered species.

Sediment impacted by wood waste in shallow marine subtidal areas utilized for log storage can result in impaired productive habitat, interrupting or preventing the early marine survival of salmon populations. Prime examples are many former log boom sites within the southern Salish Sea, including areas in Howe Sound, Squamish, Nanaimo and Cowichan estuaries, and Sechelt Inlet. (Wright, 2014)

Wood waste, as it accumulates and settles on subtidal and intertidal substrates, negatively impacts the saltwater environment physically, chemically, and biologically. Over time, the waste can decay into smaller, sometimes fibrous particles, mixing with sediment and affecting the benthic community by decreasing availability and diversity (Kendall and Michelsen, 1997).

SeaChange has been transplanting Z. marina in former log boom sites since 2005. To increase the likelihood of success at these sites, it would be beneficial to restoration efforts if research could be initiated to address conditions common in impacted log storage sites. Applied science research is planned for the summer of 1016 to investigate questions such as:

  1. How does Zostera marina adapt to changes in oxygen levels in the sediment and how can this adaptation to anaerobiosis be enhanced?
  2. What is the tolerance level of Z. marina to the presence of hydrogen sulfides? Can the impacts be mitigated on a small and affordable scale to enhance restoration?
  3. Can the degree of wood waste degradation be measured in the field to determine the suitability of the sediment for the restoration of Z. marina?

Wright, N. 2013-2015 Final Report: Salish Sea Nearshore Conservation Project, 2015.

Kendall, D., and T. Michelsen. 1997. Management of wood waste under dredged material management programs (DMMP) and the sediment management standards (SMS) cleanup program. Seattle District, ACOE, and Washington Department of Ecology.