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Date Permissions Signed

7-1-2011

Date of Award

2011

Document Type

Masters Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Bedi, Robinder P.

Second Advisor

Hyman, Ira E.

Third Advisor

Jantzen, Kelly J.

Abstract

Despite well known health risks, cigarette smoking remains very prevalent in the United States. In addition, those who attempt to quite are very likely to relapse. Cognitive predictors have not been well examined to date, despite evidence from the Incentive- Sensitization model of addiction that cognitive processes play a large role in relapse and continued addictive behavior (Robinson & Berridge, 1993). To address if the cognitive adaptations involved in the Incentive-Sensitization model are permanent or semi-permanent, this current study examined the abilities of current smokers (n = 15), former smokers (n = 13), and never smokers (n = 15) to detect changes involving both smoking-related stimuli and neutral stimuli using a flicker paradigm. Contrary to the hypotheses, the current smokers did not exhibit a bias in attention toward smoking-related stimuli, and no group differed in change-detection capabilities when compared to any other group. Possible reasons for the unexpected findings are presented, as well as discussion about the construction of an effective change-detection task.

Type

Text

Publisher

Western Washington University

OCLC Number

743882996

Digital Format

application/pdf

Genre/Form

Academic theses

Language

English

Rights

Copying of this thesis in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this thesis for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

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