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Date Permissions Signed

9-5-2014

Date of Award

2009

Document Type

Masters Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Anthropology

First Advisor

Campbell, Sarah K.

Second Advisor

Stevenson, Joan C.

Third Advisor

Grimes, Michael A.

Abstract

Existing osteological literature often lacks descriptions and illustrations of the smaller elements, such as hand and foot bones, of animals commonly found in the archaeological record. Black bear (Ursus americanus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) are both cosmopolitan species and important resources for indigenous peoples, resulting in their widespread presence in faunal assemblages. Additionally, the carpal and tarsal elements of these two mammalian taxa can be difficult to distinguish from human elements because of their similarities in size and shape. Proper identification of faunal and human remains is paramount to responsible cultural resource management (CRM). This thesis presents a textual and photographic osteological guide of black bear and mule deer carpals and tarsals and provides the means for distinguishing these elements from their human counterparts.

Type

Text

Publisher

Western Washington University

OCLC Number

417813807

Digital Format

application/pdf

Genre/Form

Academic theses

Language

English

Rights

Copying of this thesis in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this thesis for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Included in

Anthropology Commons

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