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Date Permissions Signed

12-1-2014

Date of Award

2014

Document Type

Masters Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

History

First Advisor

Friday, Chris, 1959-

Second Advisor

Leonard, Kevin Allen, 1964-

Third Advisor

Seltz, Jennifer

Abstract

Against a teleological narrative of inevitable U.S. hegemony in what is now the southwest corner of Washington State, this work argues that settler colonialism has been a co-creation of local indigenous peoples and settlers that has emerged from the mid-nineteenth century onward through continuous negotiations of power and influence. The uneasy co-existence between metanarratives of U.S. westward expansion and local narratives produced through the colonial encounter give rise to productive contradictions that provide materials to reframe the dominant narratives that continue to naturalize settler colonial power today.

Type

Text

Publisher

Western Washington University

OCLC Number

897928331

Digital Format

application/pdf

Subjects – Names (LCNAF)

Stevens, Isaac Ingalls, 1818-1862

Geographic Coverage

Washington (State)

Genre/Form

Academic theses

Language

English

Rights

Copying of this thesis in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this thesis for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Included in

History Commons

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