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Date Permissions Signed

12-14-2010

Date of Award

Fall 2010

Document Type

Masters Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Theatre & Dance

First Advisor

Kuntz, Mark

Second Advisor

Lortz, James

Third Advisor

O'Reilly, Maureen E.

Abstract

How did the American theatre community respond to the events of September and how did the response shape new dramatic works? This thesis will examine the American theatre before and directly after the events of September ll’^^, 2001. The response to theatrical works being written and performed will be examined by reviews. Also, the political activism from theatre artists will be discussed. The thesis will also look at the dramatic literature that was written in response to these events. With more dramatic works being written, there are categories which emerged. The categories are plays written before 9/11 with parallel themes of post 9/11 plays, remembrance, responses to the politics and policies directly after 9/11 and the Bush administration. The following plays will be used to demonstrate the three categories:

Omnium Gatherum by Theresa Rebeck and Alexandra Gersten-Vassilaros

Guantanamo: 'Honor Bound to Defend Freedom' by Victoria Brittain & Gillian Slovo

The Guys by Anne Nelson

Stuff Happens by David Hare

with Their Eyes: September 11th—The View from a High School at Ground Zero by Annie Thoms

Wake Up and Smell the Coffee by Eric Bogosian

The Women of Lockerbie by Deborah Brevoort

9 Parts of Desire by Heather Raffo

Using excerpts from these scripts, the thesis will define the categories and how each plays best fit into the categories.

Type

Text

Publisher

Western Washington University

OCLC Number

823241887

Digital Format

application/pdf

Genre/Form

Academic theses

Language

English

Rights

Copying of this thesis in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this thesis for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

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