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Date Permissions Signed

7-2016

Date of Award

Summer 2016

Document Type

Masters Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Trimble, Joseph E.

Second Advisor

King, Jeff J.

Third Advisor

Schudlich, Tina Dawn Du Rocher

Abstract

The aim of this study is to examine how Puerto Rican women undergoing illicit drug and/or alcohol treatment cope with stress and how specific coping strategies may relate to greater well-being. Thirty-five participants were recruited from six different treatment centers in Puerto Rico. Participants described two stressful events, one with internal control and other with low internal control. Problem and emotion-focused coping strategies were measured with the Spanish version of the Brief COPE inventory. Quality of life was measured with the Spanish version of the WHOQOL-BREF, both measures have good internal reliability and have been used among Hispanic samples. Moreover, social support was measured using the Spanish version of the MOS Social Support Scale to test its effect over coping strategies and quality of life. We expect that when there is low control, emotion-focused will be positively related with quality of life insofar that emotion-focused coping will be positively associated with emotional social support which will then predict quality of life. Additionally, when there is high control, problem-focused coping will be positively related with quality of life insofar that problem-focused coping will be positively associated with instrumental social support which will then predict quality of life. This was one of the first studies that examined coping strategies and quality of life among Puerto Rican women undergoing illicit drug and/or alcohol recovery. Understanding how women cope and its relation with quality of life might provide a better insight to treatment development and long-term recovery

Type

Text

Publisher

Western Washington University

OCLC Number

956467521

Digital Format

application/pdf

Geographic Coverage

Puerto Rico

Genre/Form

Academic theses

Language

English

Language Code

eng

Rights

Copying of this thesis in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this thesis for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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