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Date Permissions Signed

2-17-2011

Date of Award

2011

Document Type

Masters Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

History

First Advisor

Lopez, A. Ricardo, 1974-

Second Advisor

Eurich, S. Amanda, 1956-

Third Advisor

Mariz, George

Abstract

During the latter-half of the twentieth century, large numbers of West Indians began immigrating to New York from throughout the Caribbean. These actors helped transplant and build upon a longstanding Carnival tradition that existed in the Caribbean. Imbued with a deep cultural significance because of its role during the Caribbean's colonial, emancipation, and independence periods, the Carnival tradition serves West Indian immigrants by providing a point of unification, challenging racial categories in the United States, and by drawing political and cultural attention to the growing number of West Indians settling in New York City.

Type

Text

Publisher

Western Washington University

OCLC Number

721962447

Digital Format

application/pdf

Geographic Coverage

New York (N.Y.)

Genre/Form

Academic theses

Language

English

Rights

Copying of this thesis in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this thesis for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Included in

History Commons

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