Document Type

Article

Publication Date

12-10-2021

Keywords

Philippines, Filipino, Creole, Colonization, Linguistics, Language, Codeswitch

Abstract

With the rapid globalization of the Philippines, exacerbated by the colonial mentality that those who speak English are smarter and better, more and more Filipinos are favoring English over their native dialect. With the above in mind, I became curious if there was a possibility that Tagalog will disappear in fifty to one hundred years if this trend continues. As I gathered data, read ethnographic works and research, I have found that Tagalog is not disappearing; it is giving birth to a creole language: Taglish. The Philippine historical and political past is tumultuous. Having been subjected to colonization for hundreds of years, this greatly affected not only the culture, politics, and mindset of the Filipino people, but has dramatically changed their languages. Today, education is taught in two languages—English and Filipino, Filipino being the standardized register of Tagalog—and it has been inculcated in the minds of the young ones that English is the language of democracy and progress while Filipino is of nationality and patriotism. Eventually, codeswitching between these two languages, called Taglish, became prevalent that there are children in the Metro Manila, and possibly in other regions of the Philippines, who either only speak English as their mother tongue, or have embraced Taglish instead of being fluent in Filipino.

Subjects - Topical (LCSH)

Endangered languages--Philippines; Tagalog language--Foreign elements--English; English language--Foreign elements--Tagalog; English language--Study and teaching--Filipino speakers; Creole dialects--Philippines

Geographic Coverage

Philippines

Genre/Form

articles

Type

Text

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Included in

Anthropology Commons

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