Document Type

Book Review

Publication Date

3-2010

Keywords

Women's life writing, Life writing

Abstract

In Owning Up: Privacy, Property, and Belonging in U.S. Women’s Life Writing, Katherine Adams sets out to explore “the consequences of imagining human existence in terms of two antagonistic and simultaneous conditions—we are owned, we are not owned— and of incessantly rehearsing the drama of passage between them” (p. 203). Adams is particularly concerned with “how such representations, and the fantasy they project of self-(non)-possession—that is, of self-possession without self-alienation—intersect with questions about democratic freedom and nationhood” (p. 203). Locating her discussion in the culturally unstable period of 1840–90, Adams moves from the antebellum context of romantic nationalism to the late nineteenth century’s vexed lament for a perceived loss of privacy.

Publication Title

The New England Quarterly

Volume

83

Issue

1

First Page

155

Last Page

158

Required Publisher's Statement

Posted Online February 19, 2010
https://doi.org/10.1162/tneq.2010.83.1.155

© 2010 by The New England Quarterly

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS