Event Title

Teaching Colonialism, Complexity, and Survivance: A Pedagogical Journey

Streaming Media

Description

In the US, Canada, and elsewhere, the legacies of colonialism for Indigenous and settler peoples are among the most pressing, complicated, and intractable problems in both policy and everyday life. What is the role of the university in this process? And what role does higher education play in our shared lives as students, scholars, and citizens, Indigenous or otherwise? Who bears the burden of, and responsibility for, the history of colonialism? How can non-Indigenous people best be allies to Indigenous peoples and their concerns? What does it mean to “belong” to a place in the context of colonialism? And what are the ethical, moral, and theoretical challenges regarding how we tell the story of the past (and present)?

About the Lecturer: Coll Thrush, Associate Professor of History, University of British Columbia

Document Type

Event

Start Date

20-4-2011 11:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2011 1:15 PM

Location

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Resource Type

Moving image

Title of Series

World Issues Forum

Genre/Form

lectures

Contributing Repository

Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies

Keywords

Colonialism, Indigenous peoples, Settler peoples, History of colonialism

Rights

This resources is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws.

Language

English

Format

video/mp4

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Apr 20th, 11:00 AM Apr 20th, 1:15 PM

Teaching Colonialism, Complexity, and Survivance: A Pedagogical Journey

Fairhaven College Auditorium

In the US, Canada, and elsewhere, the legacies of colonialism for Indigenous and settler peoples are among the most pressing, complicated, and intractable problems in both policy and everyday life. What is the role of the university in this process? And what role does higher education play in our shared lives as students, scholars, and citizens, Indigenous or otherwise? Who bears the burden of, and responsibility for, the history of colonialism? How can non-Indigenous people best be allies to Indigenous peoples and their concerns? What does it mean to “belong” to a place in the context of colonialism? And what are the ethical, moral, and theoretical challenges regarding how we tell the story of the past (and present)?

About the Lecturer: Coll Thrush, Associate Professor of History, University of British Columbia