Event Title

How Our Way of Life is Killing Africans

Speaker

Gary Geddes

Streaming Media

Description

Every time your cell-phone rings or you reach for those cheap items on the shelves at the food store, a child dies or goes hungry in Africa. Why? Because the coltan that is an essential heat-resistant component in cell-phones, computers, play stations and all the new electronic gadgets that clutter and consume our hours is being mined by starving children working barefoot in unsupported mines shafts that often collapse. Our low food prices are achieved through government subsidies that make it impossible for Africans to sell their agricultural products on the world market. And many of our pension funds are invested in mining companies that care nothing for human rights or the environment. These are just a few of the issues that emerge in Gary Geddes's new non-fiction book Drink the Bitter Root: A search for justice and healing in Africa (Counterpoint Press), the story of his human rights interviews with women raped and infected with HIV, victims mutilated by the Lord's Resistance Army, former child soldiers, refugees, displaced persons and poets turned freedom fighters.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

22-2-2012 12:00 PM

End Date

22-2-2012 1:00 PM

Location

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Resource Type

Moving image

Title of Series

World Issues Forum

Genre/Form

lectures

Contributing Repository

Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies

Keywords

Coltan mining, Human rights, Exploitation of Africa

Rights

This resources is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws.

Language

English

Format

video/mp4

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Feb 22nd, 12:00 PM Feb 22nd, 1:00 PM

How Our Way of Life is Killing Africans

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Every time your cell-phone rings or you reach for those cheap items on the shelves at the food store, a child dies or goes hungry in Africa. Why? Because the coltan that is an essential heat-resistant component in cell-phones, computers, play stations and all the new electronic gadgets that clutter and consume our hours is being mined by starving children working barefoot in unsupported mines shafts that often collapse. Our low food prices are achieved through government subsidies that make it impossible for Africans to sell their agricultural products on the world market. And many of our pension funds are invested in mining companies that care nothing for human rights or the environment. These are just a few of the issues that emerge in Gary Geddes's new non-fiction book Drink the Bitter Root: A search for justice and healing in Africa (Counterpoint Press), the story of his human rights interviews with women raped and infected with HIV, victims mutilated by the Lord's Resistance Army, former child soldiers, refugees, displaced persons and poets turned freedom fighters.