Event Title

Seeking Salaam— Ethiopians, Eritreans, and Somalis in the Pacific Northwest

Streaming Media

Description

Prolonged violence in the Horn of Africa, the northeastern corner of the continent, has led growing numbers of Ethiopians, Eritreans, and Somalis to flee to the United States. Despite the enmity created by centuries of conflict, they often find themselves living as neighbors in their adopted cities, with their children as class-mates in school. In many ways, they are successfully navigating life in their new home; however, they continue to struggle to bridge old divisions and find salaam, or peace, with one another. News from home of continuing conflict fuels historical grievances and perpetuates tensions within these communities, resulting in ongoing enmity that can undermine attempts at reconciliation. Such involvement with the past can also delay acculturation and sabotage opportunities to attain the American Dream. In conversations with more than forty East African immigrants living in Seattle, Washington, and Portland, Oregon, Sandra Chait captures the immigrants' struggle for identity in the face of competing stories and documents how some individuals have been able to transcend the ghosts from the past and extend a tentative hand to their former enemies.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

11-1-2012 12:00 PM

End Date

11-1-2012 1:00 PM

Location

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Resource Type

Moving image

Title of Series

World Issues Forum

Genre/Form

lectures

Contributing Repository

Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies

Keywords

East African immigrants

Rights

This resources is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws.

Language

English

Format

video/mp4

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Jan 11th, 12:00 PM Jan 11th, 1:00 PM

Seeking Salaam— Ethiopians, Eritreans, and Somalis in the Pacific Northwest

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Prolonged violence in the Horn of Africa, the northeastern corner of the continent, has led growing numbers of Ethiopians, Eritreans, and Somalis to flee to the United States. Despite the enmity created by centuries of conflict, they often find themselves living as neighbors in their adopted cities, with their children as class-mates in school. In many ways, they are successfully navigating life in their new home; however, they continue to struggle to bridge old divisions and find salaam, or peace, with one another. News from home of continuing conflict fuels historical grievances and perpetuates tensions within these communities, resulting in ongoing enmity that can undermine attempts at reconciliation. Such involvement with the past can also delay acculturation and sabotage opportunities to attain the American Dream. In conversations with more than forty East African immigrants living in Seattle, Washington, and Portland, Oregon, Sandra Chait captures the immigrants' struggle for identity in the face of competing stories and documents how some individuals have been able to transcend the ghosts from the past and extend a tentative hand to their former enemies.