Event Title

They Like to Work Bent Over: Latino Migrant Health and the Normalization of Inequality

Streaming Media

Description

Based on ethnographic fieldwork with undocumented, indigenous Triqui migrant laborers from the Mexican State of Oaxaca, Seth Holmes will present research from his forthcoming book: Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Indigenous Mexican Farmworkers in the United States. In following their migration circuit from the mountains of Oaxaca through the desert borderlands of Arizona to the farmlands of Washington State, his research explores indigeneity, ethnicity, citizenship, labor, and suffering hierarchies as well as the processes by which these are rendered invisible, normal, and natural. He will address the structures of this injurious hierarchy and how they are channeled through international borders, domestic racism, classism, sexism and anti-“illegal” immigrant prejudices.

About the Lecturer: Seth Holmes is the Martin Sisters Endowed Chair and Assistant Professor at the University of California Berkeley.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

20-2-2013 12:00 PM

End Date

20-2-2013 1:15 PM

Location

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Resource Type

Moving image

Title of Series

World Issues Forum

Genre/Form

lectures

Contributing Repository

Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies

Keywords

Latino migrant health, Indigenous Mexican farmworkers, Migration circuit

Rights

This resources is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws.

Language

English

Format

video/mp4

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Feb 20th, 12:00 PM Feb 20th, 1:15 PM

They Like to Work Bent Over: Latino Migrant Health and the Normalization of Inequality

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Based on ethnographic fieldwork with undocumented, indigenous Triqui migrant laborers from the Mexican State of Oaxaca, Seth Holmes will present research from his forthcoming book: Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Indigenous Mexican Farmworkers in the United States. In following their migration circuit from the mountains of Oaxaca through the desert borderlands of Arizona to the farmlands of Washington State, his research explores indigeneity, ethnicity, citizenship, labor, and suffering hierarchies as well as the processes by which these are rendered invisible, normal, and natural. He will address the structures of this injurious hierarchy and how they are channeled through international borders, domestic racism, classism, sexism and anti-“illegal” immigrant prejudices.

About the Lecturer: Seth Holmes is the Martin Sisters Endowed Chair and Assistant Professor at the University of California Berkeley.