Event Title

Tourism, Development and Sacred Peaks in the Himalaya

Streaming Media

Description

The Himalaya range has long been a site for mountaineering and exploration as well as pilgrimage, mountain worship and high altitude farming and pastoral life. Kawa Karpo (Meili Snow Mountain) in Southwestern China is a prominent site for pilgrims from across the Tibetan plateau, and increasingly popular with Han Chinese tourists as well. Government plans for roads to facilitate tourism are likely to have major effects on remote villages. Similar tourism promotion is slated for small mountain communities in Zanskar, in northern India. The fate of community development and mountain worship in these villages provide lessons for tourism, politics and development issues across Southwest China and the Himalaya region overall.

About the Lecturers: Julie Tate-Libby, PhD, Instructor of Anthropology and Sociology, Wenatchee Valley College & James Loucky, Professor of Anthropology at WWU will offer a comparative response

Document Type

Event

Start Date

17-10-2012 12:00 PM

End Date

17-10-2012 1:15 PM

Location

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Resource Type

Moving image

Title of Series

World Issues Forum

Genre/Form

lectures

Contributing Repository

Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies

Keywords

Himalayan tourism, Kawa Karpo, Han Chinese tourists, Mountain worship

Rights

This resources is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws.

Language

English

Format

video/mp4

Share

COinS
 
Oct 17th, 12:00 PM Oct 17th, 1:15 PM

Tourism, Development and Sacred Peaks in the Himalaya

Fairhaven College Auditorium

The Himalaya range has long been a site for mountaineering and exploration as well as pilgrimage, mountain worship and high altitude farming and pastoral life. Kawa Karpo (Meili Snow Mountain) in Southwestern China is a prominent site for pilgrims from across the Tibetan plateau, and increasingly popular with Han Chinese tourists as well. Government plans for roads to facilitate tourism are likely to have major effects on remote villages. Similar tourism promotion is slated for small mountain communities in Zanskar, in northern India. The fate of community development and mountain worship in these villages provide lessons for tourism, politics and development issues across Southwest China and the Himalaya region overall.

About the Lecturers: Julie Tate-Libby, PhD, Instructor of Anthropology and Sociology, Wenatchee Valley College & James Loucky, Professor of Anthropology at WWU will offer a comparative response