Event Title

Frictions of Conversion and Contention: Religion and Activism in the Tohono O’odham Borderlands

Streaming Media

Description

“Due to US border policies that funnel migrants through the harsh Arizona desert, thousands of people have crossed and died on Tohono O’odham lands. Mike Wilson, a tribal member and activist, leaves water in the desert for migrants, against the wishes of his tribal council and the United States Border Patrol. To the surprise of many, in the 1980s Wilson was a member of the US Army Special Forces stationed in El Salvador. How did a Green Beret become an outspoken human rights activist? Professor Lucero argues that religion provided the “friction” that both enabled and constrained his activism.”

About the Lecturer: Jose Antonio Lucero, Hanauer Honors Professor, Associate Professor, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Chair, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, University of Washington

Document Type

Event

Start Date

6-11-2013 12:00 PM

End Date

6-11-2013 1:15 PM

Location

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Resource Type

Moving image

Title of Series

World Issues Forum

Genre/Form

lectures

Contributing Repository

Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies

Keywords

U.S. border policies, Human rights activism

Rights

This resources is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws.

Language

English

Format

video/mp4

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Nov 6th, 12:00 PM Nov 6th, 1:15 PM

Frictions of Conversion and Contention: Religion and Activism in the Tohono O’odham Borderlands

Fairhaven College Auditorium

“Due to US border policies that funnel migrants through the harsh Arizona desert, thousands of people have crossed and died on Tohono O’odham lands. Mike Wilson, a tribal member and activist, leaves water in the desert for migrants, against the wishes of his tribal council and the United States Border Patrol. To the surprise of many, in the 1980s Wilson was a member of the US Army Special Forces stationed in El Salvador. How did a Green Beret become an outspoken human rights activist? Professor Lucero argues that religion provided the “friction” that both enabled and constrained his activism.”

About the Lecturer: Jose Antonio Lucero, Hanauer Honors Professor, Associate Professor, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Chair, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, University of Washington