Event Title

Climate Change in Bangladesh: Confronting a Mega-Disaster

Streaming Media

Description

Average annual temperatures in Bangladesh have increased around 1 ºC between 1950 and 2008. Less uniform are increases in annual rainfall. The frequency of high-magnitude floods and more intense tropical cyclones has increased significantly, especially during the last 50 years. Sea level has been rising 4-8 mm/year along the Bangladesh coast. Depending on the population projection for 2100, a 1-meter rise in sea level would constitute a mega-disaster for Bangladesh, likely displacing between 29 million and 41 million of coastal population. To confront this mega-disaster, the demand for financial compensation for damage based on the “polluter pays” principle may not be tenable for either intergenerational distributive justice or corrective justice. Therefore, international technical and financial assistance for a range of climate change adaptation projects would, perhaps, provide a more realistic way of achieving a semblance of climate justice for Bangladesh.

About the Lecturer: Harun Rashid, PhD Emeritus Professor, Dept. of Geography & Earth Science University of Wisconsin-La Crosse

Document Type

Event

Start Date

14-5-2014 12:00 PM

End Date

14-5-2014 1:15 PM

Location

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Resource Type

Moving image

Title of Series

World Issues Forum

Genre/Form

lectures

Contributing Repository

Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies

Keywords

Climate change, Bangladesh, Climate justice

Rights

This resources is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws.

Language

English

Format

video/mp4

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May 14th, 12:00 PM May 14th, 1:15 PM

Climate Change in Bangladesh: Confronting a Mega-Disaster

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Average annual temperatures in Bangladesh have increased around 1 ºC between 1950 and 2008. Less uniform are increases in annual rainfall. The frequency of high-magnitude floods and more intense tropical cyclones has increased significantly, especially during the last 50 years. Sea level has been rising 4-8 mm/year along the Bangladesh coast. Depending on the population projection for 2100, a 1-meter rise in sea level would constitute a mega-disaster for Bangladesh, likely displacing between 29 million and 41 million of coastal population. To confront this mega-disaster, the demand for financial compensation for damage based on the “polluter pays” principle may not be tenable for either intergenerational distributive justice or corrective justice. Therefore, international technical and financial assistance for a range of climate change adaptation projects would, perhaps, provide a more realistic way of achieving a semblance of climate justice for Bangladesh.

About the Lecturer: Harun Rashid, PhD Emeritus Professor, Dept. of Geography & Earth Science University of Wisconsin-La Crosse