Event Title

Global Food Production and Climate Change

Streaming Media

Description

By the end of the century, the season averaged growing temperature will very likely exceed the highest temperature ever recorded throughout the tropics and subtropics. By 2050, the increase in temperature alone will cause a 20% reduction in the yield of all of the major grains (maize, rice, wheat and soybeans). The breadbasket countries in the midlatitudes will experience marked increases in year-to-year volatility in crop production. Increasing stresses on the major crops due to climate change, coupled with the increasing demand for food due to increasing population and development, present significant challenges to achieving global food security.

About the Lecturer: David Battisti, Professor of Atmospheric Sciences, and Tamaki Endowed Chair, UW

Document Type

Event

Start Date

5-2-2014 12:00 PM

End Date

5-2-2014 1:15 PM

Location

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Resource Type

Moving image

Title of Series

World Issues Forum

Genre/Form

lectures

Contributing Repository

Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies

Keywords

Global food production, Climate change, Global food security

Rights

This resources is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws.

Language

English

Format

video/mp4

Share

COinS
 
Feb 5th, 12:00 PM Feb 5th, 1:15 PM

Global Food Production and Climate Change

Fairhaven College Auditorium

By the end of the century, the season averaged growing temperature will very likely exceed the highest temperature ever recorded throughout the tropics and subtropics. By 2050, the increase in temperature alone will cause a 20% reduction in the yield of all of the major grains (maize, rice, wheat and soybeans). The breadbasket countries in the midlatitudes will experience marked increases in year-to-year volatility in crop production. Increasing stresses on the major crops due to climate change, coupled with the increasing demand for food due to increasing population and development, present significant challenges to achieving global food security.

About the Lecturer: David Battisti, Professor of Atmospheric Sciences, and Tamaki Endowed Chair, UW