Event Title

Upstream Development versus Downstream Risk on Transboundary Watersheds - The Taku, Stikine and Unuk Rivers

Speaker

Anne Muter

Streaming Media

Description

Transboundary water governance along the BC – Alaska border is at a crossroads. The rich ecological values of the Taku, Stikine and Unuk watersheds are threatened by multiple large mine proposals in the headwaters that pose a risk to fish, wildlife, habitat, and water quality and the livelihoods and cultures that depend on them. Organizations in Alaska are advocating for a referral to the International Joint Commission under the Boundary Waters Treaty. Taking a different approach, BC and Alaska recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding. The question remains how development in the headwaters of BC and risks in downstream Alaska can be effectively managed.

About the Lecturer: Anne Muter has a background in science and law, with a focus on their intersection. Anne has an earth and ocean sciences undergraduate degree, a law degree, and a Master’s in Water Science, Policy, and Management. She splits her time between working as a litigator and advising not-for-profit organizations on water policy issues. Anne is the lead on a transboundary watersheds governance initiative for the organization Rivers Without Borders Canada. This work seeks to engage with academics and water governance practitioners to develop governance mechanism for the transboundary watersheds of north-western BC and south-east Alaska.

RWB Canada’s Transboundary Watersheds Governance Initiative is being led from Vancouver by Anne. She describes herself as endlessly curious about the water cycle and is dedicated to striving for responsible watershed management. Fittingly, Anne’s background is in science and law, with a focus on their intersection. She has a natural sciences degree from the University of British Columbia, a law degree from the University of Victoria, and a Master’s in Water Science, Policy, and Management from Oxford. Anne tries to spend as much time as possible cross-country skiing, sailing, biking and hiking.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

13-1-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

13-1-2016 1:15 PM

Location

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Resource Type

Moving image

Title of Series

World Issues Forum

Genre/Form

lectures

Contributing Repository

Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies

Keywords

Transboundary water governance, Transboundary watersheds

Rights

This resources is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws.

Language

English

Format

video/mp4

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Jan 13th, 12:00 PM Jan 13th, 1:15 PM

Upstream Development versus Downstream Risk on Transboundary Watersheds - The Taku, Stikine and Unuk Rivers

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Transboundary water governance along the BC – Alaska border is at a crossroads. The rich ecological values of the Taku, Stikine and Unuk watersheds are threatened by multiple large mine proposals in the headwaters that pose a risk to fish, wildlife, habitat, and water quality and the livelihoods and cultures that depend on them. Organizations in Alaska are advocating for a referral to the International Joint Commission under the Boundary Waters Treaty. Taking a different approach, BC and Alaska recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding. The question remains how development in the headwaters of BC and risks in downstream Alaska can be effectively managed.

About the Lecturer: Anne Muter has a background in science and law, with a focus on their intersection. Anne has an earth and ocean sciences undergraduate degree, a law degree, and a Master’s in Water Science, Policy, and Management. She splits her time between working as a litigator and advising not-for-profit organizations on water policy issues. Anne is the lead on a transboundary watersheds governance initiative for the organization Rivers Without Borders Canada. This work seeks to engage with academics and water governance practitioners to develop governance mechanism for the transboundary watersheds of north-western BC and south-east Alaska.

RWB Canada’s Transboundary Watersheds Governance Initiative is being led from Vancouver by Anne. She describes herself as endlessly curious about the water cycle and is dedicated to striving for responsible watershed management. Fittingly, Anne’s background is in science and law, with a focus on their intersection. She has a natural sciences degree from the University of British Columbia, a law degree from the University of Victoria, and a Master’s in Water Science, Policy, and Management from Oxford. Anne tries to spend as much time as possible cross-country skiing, sailing, biking and hiking.