Event Title

Migrants, Refugees, and Citizens: Some Hard Questions for Immigration Policy

Description

Immigration has been one of the most contentious issues of our time, not just in the United States, but throughout the world. Anyone who ventures into this thicket needs to think about some hard questions. First, are immigrants’ rights a type of civil rights, human rights, or some other approach to justice and fairness? Second, how have mass migrations of people fleeing war, the breakdown of civil society, or environmental degradation challenged traditional perspectives on immigration? Third, is it possible or desirable to think about immigration without a path to citizenship? And fourth, how should economic inequality inside the United States or any other destination country influence immigration policy? I will discuss why these questions are so hard, how they are tied to each other, and why they are unavoidable if there is any common ground to be found on immigration issues.

This Forum is brought to you by: The Center for Law, Diversity, and Justice at Fairhaven College, The Ralph Munro Institute for Civic Education, and the Border Policy Research Institute

About the Lecturer: Hiroshi Motomura is the Susan Westerberg Prager Professor of Law at the UCLA School of Law. He is the author of two award-winning books: Immigration Outside the Law, and Americans in Waiting, and the co-author of two law school casebooks, one on immigration and citizenship, and the other on refugees and asylum. He is a founding director of the Rocky Mountain Immigrant Advocacy Network (RMIAN) and Vice Chair of the Board of Directors of the National Immigration Law Center. He has received several teaching awards, including the UCLA Distinguished Teaching Award in 2014, and was one of just 26 law professors nationwide profiled in What the Best Law Teachers Do.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

3-5-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

3-5-2017 1:20 PM

Location

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Resource Type

Moving image

Title of Series

World Issues Forum

Genre/Form

lectures

Contributing Repository

Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies

Keywords

Immigrants' rights, Human rights, Civil rights

Comments

This video is not available.

Rights

This resources is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws.

Language

English

Format

video/mp4

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 3rd, 12:00 PM May 3rd, 1:20 PM

Migrants, Refugees, and Citizens: Some Hard Questions for Immigration Policy

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Immigration has been one of the most contentious issues of our time, not just in the United States, but throughout the world. Anyone who ventures into this thicket needs to think about some hard questions. First, are immigrants’ rights a type of civil rights, human rights, or some other approach to justice and fairness? Second, how have mass migrations of people fleeing war, the breakdown of civil society, or environmental degradation challenged traditional perspectives on immigration? Third, is it possible or desirable to think about immigration without a path to citizenship? And fourth, how should economic inequality inside the United States or any other destination country influence immigration policy? I will discuss why these questions are so hard, how they are tied to each other, and why they are unavoidable if there is any common ground to be found on immigration issues.

This Forum is brought to you by: The Center for Law, Diversity, and Justice at Fairhaven College, The Ralph Munro Institute for Civic Education, and the Border Policy Research Institute

About the Lecturer: Hiroshi Motomura is the Susan Westerberg Prager Professor of Law at the UCLA School of Law. He is the author of two award-winning books: Immigration Outside the Law, and Americans in Waiting, and the co-author of two law school casebooks, one on immigration and citizenship, and the other on refugees and asylum. He is a founding director of the Rocky Mountain Immigrant Advocacy Network (RMIAN) and Vice Chair of the Board of Directors of the National Immigration Law Center. He has received several teaching awards, including the UCLA Distinguished Teaching Award in 2014, and was one of just 26 law professors nationwide profiled in What the Best Law Teachers Do.