Event Title

Tulalip From My Heart: Honoring the Work and Legacy of Harriette Shelton Dover

Description

In Tulalip, From My Heart, Harriette Shelton Dover describes her life on the Tulalip Reservation and recounts the myriad problems tribes faced after resettlement. Born in 1904, Dover grew up hearing the elders of her tribe tell of the hardships involved in moving from their villages to the reservation on Tulalip Bay: inadequate supplies of food and water, harsh economic conditions, and religious persecution outlawing community houses and other ceremonial practices.

In this Forum, anthropologist Darleen Fitzpatrick will discuss Mrs. Dover’s research. Ray Fryberg, Glen Gobin, and Patti Gobin from the Tulalip Tribes will discuss their memories of Harriette Shelton Dover and the importance of her book.

About the Lecturers:

Darleen Fitzpatrick is a social anthropologist. Her research specialty is religion, ethnicity, and Native North America with an emphasis upon the Northwest Coast. Her writings include A Gift from God (an ethnography of the Indian Shaker religion in the Pacific Northwest), and We Are Cowlitz (a study of Cowlitz ethnicity or ethnic identity), and editor of Harriette S. Dover’s Tulalip From My Heart. She taught anthropology at Everett Community College.

Raymond Fryberg is serves as the Commissioner of Fisheries and Natural Resources for the Tulalip Tribes

Glen Gobin served on the Tulalip Board of Directors for 17 years. He also served on the Quil Ceda Village Council that oversees business and development activities and on the Planning, Gaming, and Fish commissions.

Patti Gobin has over 25 years of Community Development experience with the Tulalip Tribes. Presently, Ms. Gobin is with the Natural Resource Treaty Rights office working with state, local and federal agencies regarding those issues that impact the life ways of the Tulalip Tribes.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

4-10-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

4-10-2017 1:20 PM

Location

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Resource Type

Moving image

Title of Series

World Issues Forum

Genre/Form

lectures

Contributing Repository

Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies

Keywords

Tulalip Reservation, Resettlement, Tribal elders

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Language

English

Format

video/mp4

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Oct 4th, 12:00 PM Oct 4th, 1:20 PM

Tulalip From My Heart: Honoring the Work and Legacy of Harriette Shelton Dover

Fairhaven College Auditorium

In Tulalip, From My Heart, Harriette Shelton Dover describes her life on the Tulalip Reservation and recounts the myriad problems tribes faced after resettlement. Born in 1904, Dover grew up hearing the elders of her tribe tell of the hardships involved in moving from their villages to the reservation on Tulalip Bay: inadequate supplies of food and water, harsh economic conditions, and religious persecution outlawing community houses and other ceremonial practices.

In this Forum, anthropologist Darleen Fitzpatrick will discuss Mrs. Dover’s research. Ray Fryberg, Glen Gobin, and Patti Gobin from the Tulalip Tribes will discuss their memories of Harriette Shelton Dover and the importance of her book.

About the Lecturers:

Darleen Fitzpatrick is a social anthropologist. Her research specialty is religion, ethnicity, and Native North America with an emphasis upon the Northwest Coast. Her writings include A Gift from God (an ethnography of the Indian Shaker religion in the Pacific Northwest), and We Are Cowlitz (a study of Cowlitz ethnicity or ethnic identity), and editor of Harriette S. Dover’s Tulalip From My Heart. She taught anthropology at Everett Community College.

Raymond Fryberg is serves as the Commissioner of Fisheries and Natural Resources for the Tulalip Tribes

Glen Gobin served on the Tulalip Board of Directors for 17 years. He also served on the Quil Ceda Village Council that oversees business and development activities and on the Planning, Gaming, and Fish commissions.

Patti Gobin has over 25 years of Community Development experience with the Tulalip Tribes. Presently, Ms. Gobin is with the Natural Resource Treaty Rights office working with state, local and federal agencies regarding those issues that impact the life ways of the Tulalip Tribes.