Event Title

Why Does China Hesitate to Impose Economic Sanctions against North Korea Seriously?

Streaming Media

Description

When we assume that North Korea is not a nuclear power yet, how can we bring North Korea to the dialogue table and ultimately move toward denuclearization in Korean peninsula? To this ends, the world under the leadership of the UN has been imposing strong economic sanctions against North Korea over the last more than five years. Yet, its effect is in doubt given the increasing missile tests and the recent successful launch of intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) since Kim Jung Un, North Korea’s supreme leader, took office in 2011. Then, how can economic sanctions against North Korea be effective? As many argue, the role of China is critical given North Korea’s heavy reliance on resources and energy. In this talk, I will present why China still hesitate to seriously impose economic sanctions against North Korea, stressing the elements of domestic, historical, and international politics.

About the Lecturer: Yukyung Yeo is Associate Professor of the College of International Studies at Kyung Hee University, South Korea. Professor Yeo received her Ph. D (political science) from the University of Maryland-College Park in 2007. Before joining Kyung Hee University, she worked at the City University of Hong Kong as the post-doctoral fellow during 2007-2009 and as Assistant Professor during 2009-2011. Her research areas are Chinese political economy and foreign economic policy. They include state regulation in China’s strategic industries, state-business relations, institutional changes in the socialist market economy, as well as Chinese foreign aid regime and policies. Her research appears in The China Quarterly, Pacific Review, Journal of Contemporary China, China Review.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

25-4-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2018 1:20 PM

Location

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Resource Type

Moving image

Title of Series

World Issues Forum

Genre/Form

lectures

Contributing Repository

Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies

Keywords

Economic sanctions, North Korea, Nuclear power, Denuclearization

Rights

This resources is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws.

Language

English

Format

video/mp4

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Apr 25th, 12:00 PM Apr 25th, 1:20 PM

Why Does China Hesitate to Impose Economic Sanctions against North Korea Seriously?

Fairhaven College Auditorium

When we assume that North Korea is not a nuclear power yet, how can we bring North Korea to the dialogue table and ultimately move toward denuclearization in Korean peninsula? To this ends, the world under the leadership of the UN has been imposing strong economic sanctions against North Korea over the last more than five years. Yet, its effect is in doubt given the increasing missile tests and the recent successful launch of intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) since Kim Jung Un, North Korea’s supreme leader, took office in 2011. Then, how can economic sanctions against North Korea be effective? As many argue, the role of China is critical given North Korea’s heavy reliance on resources and energy. In this talk, I will present why China still hesitate to seriously impose economic sanctions against North Korea, stressing the elements of domestic, historical, and international politics.

About the Lecturer: Yukyung Yeo is Associate Professor of the College of International Studies at Kyung Hee University, South Korea. Professor Yeo received her Ph. D (political science) from the University of Maryland-College Park in 2007. Before joining Kyung Hee University, she worked at the City University of Hong Kong as the post-doctoral fellow during 2007-2009 and as Assistant Professor during 2009-2011. Her research areas are Chinese political economy and foreign economic policy. They include state regulation in China’s strategic industries, state-business relations, institutional changes in the socialist market economy, as well as Chinese foreign aid regime and policies. Her research appears in The China Quarterly, Pacific Review, Journal of Contemporary China, China Review.