Event Title

Rethinking the Heart of Empire: Indigenous Travellers in London, 1502-2015

Streaming Media

Description

London is famed both as the ancient center of a former empire and as a modern metropolis of bewildering complexity and diversity. Coll Thrush offers an imaginative vision of the city's past crafted from an almost entirely new perspective: that of Indigenous children, women, and men who traveled there, willingly or otherwise, from territories that became Canada, New Zealand, Australia, and the United States, beginning in the sixteenth century. They included captives and diplomats, missionaries and shamans, poets and performers. Thrush illustrates how London learned to be a global, imperial city and how Indigenous people were central to that process.

About the Lecturer: Coll Thrush (Fairhaven 1995) is professor of history at the University of British Columbia, where he is also affiliated with UBC’s Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies. He is the author of Indigenous London and Native Seattle: Histories from the Crossing-Over Place.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

29-11-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

29-11-2017 1:20 PM

Location

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Resource Type

Moving image

Title of Series

World Issues Forum

Genre/Form

lectures

Contributing Repository

Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies

Keywords

Indigenous people, History of London, Indigenous London

Rights

This resources is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws.

Language

English

Format

video/mp4

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Nov 29th, 12:00 PM Nov 29th, 1:20 PM

Rethinking the Heart of Empire: Indigenous Travellers in London, 1502-2015

Fairhaven College Auditorium

London is famed both as the ancient center of a former empire and as a modern metropolis of bewildering complexity and diversity. Coll Thrush offers an imaginative vision of the city's past crafted from an almost entirely new perspective: that of Indigenous children, women, and men who traveled there, willingly or otherwise, from territories that became Canada, New Zealand, Australia, and the United States, beginning in the sixteenth century. They included captives and diplomats, missionaries and shamans, poets and performers. Thrush illustrates how London learned to be a global, imperial city and how Indigenous people were central to that process.

About the Lecturer: Coll Thrush (Fairhaven 1995) is professor of history at the University of British Columbia, where he is also affiliated with UBC’s Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies. He is the author of Indigenous London and Native Seattle: Histories from the Crossing-Over Place.