Event Title

Dirty Work: Hop-Picking Cultures and the Perils of Diversity in the Pacific Northwest

Streaming Media

Description

A presentation by Eastern Oregon Professor of History Ryan Dearinger. The early Pacific Northwest hop industry featured a seasonal, low-wage labor force that was notable for its diversity. Americans, American Indians, European and Asian immigrants, children, entire families, tourists, convicts, and even prisoners of war toiled as hop-pickers throughout the region. In turn, settled and itinerant populations from the Puget Sound to the Willamette Valley (and beyond) carved out spaces, constructed cultural traditions and identities, and created sites of inclusion despite the persistent segregation of fields, tasks, and opportunities. Over time, the cyclical boom-and-bust nature of the hop industry, shifting ideas about the value of hop-picking, and popular narratives of white American labor, citizenship, and progress merged with ongoing anti-immigrant campaigns to physically and metaphorically transform the Northwest’s hop fields.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

25-10-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

25-10-2017 5:30 PM

Location

Wilson Library Special Collections

Resource Type

Moving image

Duration

01:15:52

Title of Series

Heritage Resources Distinguished Speakers

Genre/Form

lectures

Contributing Repository

Digital object made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Program

University Archives

Identifier

wwuarc_hrds_Dearinger20171025

Subjects – Topical (LCSH)

Hop pickers--Northwest, Pacific; Hops industry--Northwest, Pacific

Subjects – Names (LCNAF)

Dearinger, Ryan, 1979-

Geographic Coverage

Northwest, Pacific

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University. Any cited materials must be attributed to the Heritage Resources Distinguished Speakers series, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

video/mp4

Share

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Oct 25th, 4:00 PM Oct 25th, 5:30 PM

Dirty Work: Hop-Picking Cultures and the Perils of Diversity in the Pacific Northwest

Wilson Library Special Collections

A presentation by Eastern Oregon Professor of History Ryan Dearinger. The early Pacific Northwest hop industry featured a seasonal, low-wage labor force that was notable for its diversity. Americans, American Indians, European and Asian immigrants, children, entire families, tourists, convicts, and even prisoners of war toiled as hop-pickers throughout the region. In turn, settled and itinerant populations from the Puget Sound to the Willamette Valley (and beyond) carved out spaces, constructed cultural traditions and identities, and created sites of inclusion despite the persistent segregation of fields, tasks, and opportunities. Over time, the cyclical boom-and-bust nature of the hop industry, shifting ideas about the value of hop-picking, and popular narratives of white American labor, citizenship, and progress merged with ongoing anti-immigrant campaigns to physically and metaphorically transform the Northwest’s hop fields.