Event Title

Out and Out from the Family to the Community: the Housmans and the Politics of Queer Sibling Devotion

Streaming Media

Description

Mahoney explores the manner in which Laurence and Clemence’s collaborative relation became the foundation for broader forms of feminist and anticolonial political thinking. She also addresses how Laurence’s advocacy for sex reform informed his posthumous framing of his brother’s sexuality. Within their family, queer kinship engendered political activism, and political activism fostered queer kinship practices.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

9-5-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

9-5-2017 5:00 PM

Location

Wilson Library Special Collections

Resource Type

Moving image

Duration

00:57:50

Title of Series

Heritage Resources Distinguished Speakers

Genre/Form

lectures

Contributing Repository

Digital object made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Program

University Archives

Identifier

HRDS_20170509_MahoneyKristin

Subjects – Topical (LCSH)

Gays—Family relationships—England; Brothers and sisters--Relations—England; Gays—England—Identity; Gays—Political activity--England

Subjects – Names (LCNAF)

Housman family; Housman, Clemence; Housman, Laurence, 1865-1959

Geographic Coverage

England

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University. Any cited materials must be attributed to the Heritage Resources Distinguished Speakers series, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

video/mp4

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May 9th, 4:00 PM May 9th, 5:00 PM

Out and Out from the Family to the Community: the Housmans and the Politics of Queer Sibling Devotion

Wilson Library Special Collections

Mahoney explores the manner in which Laurence and Clemence’s collaborative relation became the foundation for broader forms of feminist and anticolonial political thinking. She also addresses how Laurence’s advocacy for sex reform informed his posthumous framing of his brother’s sexuality. Within their family, queer kinship engendered political activism, and political activism fostered queer kinship practices.