Document Type

Article

Publication Date

3-2015

Keywords

Enemy, Spanish culture

Abstract

With "Transforming the Enemy in Spanish Culture: The Conquest through the Lens of Textual and Visual Multiplicity", author Lauren Beck offers an exhaustive study of various subjugating discourses used to define the enemy in Spanish culture. Exploring both textual and visual resources and both archival and mass-produced sources, and with a strong reliance on primary sources, Beck offers an examination both broad and deep. Her study encompasses a wide range of history, geography and people: biblical and Roman times, Muslims during the Spanish Reconquista, the Crusades, Jews, New World indigenous peoples, Turks, black Muslim slaves from Africa, German and Dutch Protestants of the Reformation and Counter Reformation, Portugal, colonial Brazil, and hunters from Virginia. It traces the evolution of Spain’s conception of her enemies through a process of islamification and orientalization—a construction of otherness—in the Old World and the New; further, it demonstrates how, after the sixteenth century, this same “process of deoccidentalization” was co-opted by northern Europeans and used against Spain in the creation of a non-Spanish version of the conquest of the New World

Publication Title

Hispania

Volume

98

Issue

1

First Page

161

Last Page

162

DOI

10.1353/hpn.2015.0000

Required Publisher's Statement

Published by Johns Hopkins University Press

Type

Text

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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